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Matador_Doris

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About Matador_Doris

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  1. Been working on the new project since December Pete, with the same driving force and eye for detail. Here's a sneaky peek at project Ada!
  2. Not me on eBay I'm afraid, I've sold most of her accumulated parts on Facebook including the steering wheel. The project was based out of an attic room and a rented outdoor space, which was less than ideal to begin with, unfortunately due to family relations the restoration became impossible maintain due to lack of work space. I can't afford to rent a workshop large enough for a Matador and I don't own my own property.
  3. In 1998, yes. Once you've cracked time travel, let me know. She was just shy of £800 in the 1970's...(I have the receipt!)
  4. It's called having to sell your project for half the cost due to circumstances beyond your control. At £7000 I'm loosing money and quite a bit.
  5. FOR SALE: 1944 A.E.C Matador - £7000 ono An extremely low mileage wartime (July 1944) 0853 Matador with full history. Chassis number 7837. Copy of factory build sheet, original V5 and sales receipt from when Bill Kemball purchased her in 1977. A vehicle never used for forestry work, she served as bus recovery and harvest tractor. Current research suggests total mileage from new to be 6274. An overall straight chassis with localised bending, very little corrosion with original army paint throughout chassis and cab interior. A very clean wartime engine with promising oil pressure indicated. Original brass windscreens and a complete winching system which has seen very little use since new. No mechanical wear to speak of and very little corrosion. Most have been revved and winched to death as timber tractors. Doubt there's a more complete, solid, mechanically sound Matador project out there. It's thought 400-500 survive out of approximately 7000 built. Rare to find in such solid and mechanically sound condition, with the bonus of a full history. Wouldn't take much to get her going. Currently in undercover storage near Dartford, West Kent. Many additional and new old stock parts available at extra cost. Vehicle as photographed, some parts removed and in storage but present and included (including a steering wheel).
  6. I have not given up on my dreams, quite the opposite. However, an unforeseen change of direction is to be taken to accommodate a change in circumstances. Open to offers, don't offer half the asking price, be reasonable.
  7. Correct, my KING DICK, KOKEN and WARCO tools are not included.
  8. FOR SALE: 1944 A.E.C Matador - £7000 ono An extremely low mileage wartime (July 1944) 0853 Matador with full history. Chassis number 7837. Copy of factory build sheet, original V5 and sales receipt from when Bill Kemball purchased her in 1977. A vehicle never used for forestry work, she served as bus recovery and harvest tractor. Current research suggests total mileage from new to be 6274. An overall straight chassis with localised bending, very little corrosion with original army paint throughout chassis and cab interior. A very clean wartime engine with promising oil pressure indicated. Original brass windscreens and a complete winching system which has seen very little use since new. No mechanical wear to speak of and very little corrosion. Most have been revved and winched to death as timber tractors. Doubt there's a more complete, solid, mechanically sound Matador project out there. It's thought 400-500 survive out of approximately 7000 built. Rare to find in such solid and mechanically sound condition, with the bonus of a full history. Wouldn't take much to get her going. Currently in undercover storage near Dartford, West Kent. Many additional and new old stock parts available at extra cost. Vehicle as photographed, some parts removed and in storage but present and included (including a steering wheel).
  9. Breaking radio silence! New in today, the freshly reproduced winching plates for the bonnet! They are absolutely spot on, copied directly from the original. I just need to source the correct fasteners and match the hole size to the original using the bench drill. This is what it's all about, for me. Bringing history to life and experiencing the past as it was for those who lived it. The plate is no longer faded and worn but bursting with life, giving clear information to the driver.
  10. I'll be on the lookout for an original body over the coming years. Very much open to a second purchase, the right vehicle would yield the majority of parts required to complete 7837. That's the one earlymb, have you a link? She is indeed Pete, not only my first large vehicle project but the first vehicle I've ever owned (bar a bicycle) since I don't own the car I drive. As noted, I have a clear image of her end state. Whilst I have a general order in mind, it is necessary to have ones fingers in several pies, rather like plate spinning. The general idea for re-assembly is (though not necessarily the order in which parts will be restored), chassis, road springs and axles, wheels, engine, radiator, driver's structure, gearbox(es) and drive, winch, upper cab, body. The vehicle will be used for living history purposes, with long expeditions to France, Holland, Germany and Italy. She'll be found harboured up in the Norman countryside, perhaps in an orchard covered by her net as her driver (yours truly) carries out maintenance using her original toolkit, sleeping under the vehicle wrapped in blankets, washing and shaving, doing laundry, answering the call of nature, preparing meals, all in the original manner. I hope to release a book detailing the vehicle, accompanied by a series of living history photo shoots, detailing the life of a R.A driver during the second world war. My Matador, 7837, will be named after my great-great-auntie Marg (b. 1928). Not only does this name suit the Matador, it brings the Matador full circle, tying her into a large part of my families wartime history. Both my great-great-aunties went on to marry ex-servicemen. Their older brothers also served, in both the army and air force. In northwest Europe, Italy, India and Burma (large family). Upon restoration, a sign writer will be commissioned to paint 7837's name above the cab, using Marg's own handwriting (photographed) for the design. It was common for Matador, particularly in northwest Europe to be named after places they'd served or after their crews female acquaintances. Pictured, my great-great-aunties Marg (right) and Doris (b. 1927). Photo circa 1942 and December 2018.
  11. Rear end rollers pictured here with a few hard to find original pieces, including the 0853 Warner brake bracket (with it's original socket), the axle-flood lamp bracket (with the remains of it's original lamp) and a small aperture tail lamp. Not pictured but present, the trailer cable brake unit. The Matador was equipped for trailers with pneumatic, wire and electric braking.
  12. Thanks Richard, the NOS steering wheel cost several hundred pounds. The original finish will undergo polishing at low RPM to achieve a high shine, removing the light abrasions which cover it's surface. I think vapour blasting the central boss with the right media at the right pressure, would remove the rust without removing metal or the original coating. Mixed with a rust inhibitor to prevent flash rusting. I need to find an original set screw and washer or have them machined from an original, which at an educated guess, would be sherardized. Thus completing that section of Matador. 😎 Very nice box earlymb, they were indeed used for a variety of munitions. There's a comprehensive list on another forum, I'll see if I can locate it. Thanks Pete, I'm somewhat hampered by the lack of tooling at present. Progress is slow, my funds only go so far between the purchase of parts and tooling. I've just purchased a drill press, I still require a micro hone, compressor, paint system, induction heater, ultra sonic cleaner, hand drill, Dremel, torque wrench, drill bits etc Once I'm in a position to strip and re-finish parts, the project will gather momentum. I'm also hampered by space, working from an attic room, half a lockup and an outdoor location (rented). Ultimately, I'll need to find an indoor location for final assembly, which is dry, clean and secure. I can't afford to rent such a place outright, so that's a work in progress. Goal is to finish the project as a 30th Birthday present to myself in January 2024, failing that, to be ready for the D-Day 80th six months later. Hard work and a bit of luck...I may just be there. 😳
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