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TankNutUK

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Everything posted by TankNutUK

  1. Being towed - looks like an ex-British Army 2 Ton office trailer converted as living accommodation.
  2. Thanks Wally. The mystery of B269 solved.
  3. That's great research Wally, I feel a book or small pamphlet needs to be published on what has been uncovered. I have a vehicle that had a post-war overhaul at B269. Any information on B269? Many thanks, Alan
  4. Andrew, A great project for somebody. I have my own HU project on the go at the moment and wish the buyer all the best. Alan
  5. WANTED to view and scan I'm trying to find some manuals for the Humber Heavy Utility 4x4/FWD vehicle: - "Driver's Handbook" from late 1943 with reference "56/3". - "Driver's Handbook" from late 1944. - "Maintenance Manual and Instruction Book" from early/mid 1942 with reference "101/HR2". - "Replacement Parts Catalogue" from late 1941 - 1942. - any 1945 or later dated manuals. If anyone has any of these on their bookshelf I'd like to copy. Many thanks, Alan
  6. I wonder if the Panther is on the 'Russian'/separatist or Ukrainian side of the conflict border. A price in Euro makes me think that it could be in the western zone. Not sure who would be easier to negotiate with - the authorities in Kiev or big brother Bear! I guess it would make UK planning permission looks like child's play and a damn sight cheaper. Of course, the 'powers to be' might be watching as they do all of the hard work and them swoop in and confiscate 'war-like' materiel. Perhaps the local authorities will end up claiming the remains as a national treasure or even used as a memorial. Just so long as it is saved from the scrap man.
  7. The sanitation engineer must have had a great time deal of fun pulling together all of those various parts and then being told that the design had to go onto the rear of a lorry. This is a much overlooked element of a division's support services. Many personal war diaries tell of visiting the mobile bath and laundry units when rotating through in reserve and the delight of getting thoroughly cleaned. That and local cafes, ENSA shows and getting fed a proper meal. Does anyone know what water supply was used to keep the steam flowing? I suspect that somewhere on the rear of the lorry is a pump and filter to use natural water sources or Royal Engineer constructed water tanks but could a water bowser be connected? The Imperial War Museum(IWM), in London, have a model of a 'Mobile Disinfector Truck' with a description "Scratch-built model of a Second World War period British/Indian Army disinfector truck, having a wooden chassis and wheels, metal superstructure (bodywork), and glass plate windscreen. The open flat-backed rear of the truck carries a cylindrical metal boiler and stands for two disinfector drums. The drums themselves are not present. The model (based on a standard 3-ton truck) is finished in a black and brown paint camouflage scheme and is marked with the following painted (in what was originally white paint) distinguishing numbers: '25TH / F.H.S. / 602' (on left front mudguard); 'L 14794' (on left and right side of bonnet); 'W / broad arrow / D' (at rear end of flat back)."Height 126mm, Length 270 m, Width 120mm", Catalogue Number: MOD 2494: https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/30115600 (sorry - no picture). No other information jumps out of the IWM collection. Maybe more research will reveal something. I was hoping to identify the 3 ton lorry manufacturer but can't make sense of the WD Number 'L14794' from the official lists. Perhaps '25th FHS' is 25th Field Hygiene Section? The FHSs were part of the Royal Army Medical Corps (RAMC). The National Archives in Kew has War Diaries for the British and Indian 25th FHSs: http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/results/r?_q=25+field+hygiene+section
  8. I see a final drive sprocket wheel. How much remains of the rest of the vehicle I wonder? The advert appears to say that the turret is off the vehicle...so an internal ammunition explosion? Could have made quite a mess of the interior, not to mention the crew.
  9. Wow. With a 3 million Euro price tag and transport from Ukraine to Germany is extra......and then need no doubt have the front armour cut to meet German Federal law. Now where did I put my chequebook?
  10. Any photo of the bivy? Many thanks, Alan
  11. Hi Colin, Interested in two boards also to make BESAs. I'll PM. Alan
  12. Yes. Definitely a convoy light/lamp. Seen on many German (Bundeswehr) vehicles an some of other nations. Now on the rear of the British Army's MAN fleet of logistic trucks. Here is a Wiki link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blackout_light
  13. Dave, Click the "Activity" tab and then select "Search", on the right. Once the screen has refreshed, you will see two tabs "Contents Search" and "Member Search". After selecting "Member Search", type in "Anzac" into the search field. Of the three results...Alec is the one who joined in 2007. Send him a message. Hope that helps, Alan
  14. Dave, The Humber Heavy Utility register is held by Alec Small, on here as "Anzac". I don't believe this vehicle has survived in preservation. My understanding puts M4895246 as a vehicle from contract S.239 awarded in June 1942. Alan
  15. Dave, You need to speak to Alec Small. He is on here as "Anzac".
  16. Roger, Click the "Activity" tab and then select "Search", on the right. Once the screen has refreshed, you will see two tabs "Contents Search" and "Member Search". After selecting "Member Search", type in "Anzac" into the search field. Of the three results...Alec is the one who joined in 2007. Send him a message. Hope that helps, Alan
  17. Roger, The wartime Humbers came in a number of 4x2 and 4x4/FWD Heavy Utility, Pickup and Ambulance variants. A number of forum members own FWD Heavy Utility vehicles. Some on the road with others under restoration but they don't come up for sale very often. There is a register of known surviving Humber Utility vehicles managed by Alec Small (on this forum as "Anzac"). I suggest that you contact him. Regards, Alan
  18. Can anyone help identify this mysterious antenna base? It was found roof mounted on the rear of a post-war (1950s/60s) British Army softskin vehicle? The spring should be vertical. Unfortunately all cabling had already been removed. The curved base looks suspicious. Could this possibly be for an aircraft antenna? Used for ground to air communications perhaps? I'd be grateful for any information. Many thanks. Alan
  19. Looks like a lineman's or rigger's belt for climbing poles or other structures when erecting communications cables. Picture off the internet, shows a US signaller but British and Commonwealth troops needed to do the same job:
  20. Great model Brooky. I agree with Whittingham warrior that military model making was what bit many of us with the military vehicle bug and even led to buying 1:1 scale examples! I often suggest that before embarking on a restoration project, build one or more models of the chosen subject and learn all about how it is constructed and assembled. Much easier in 1:35 or even 1:72 scales than with the real thing. Good luck with your next project.
  21. Thanks for your suggestions MatchFuzee. I have a broken steering wheel and have been following up on a couple of leads. I am now in contact with both the Post Vintage Humber Car Club and Steering Wheel Restoration Services. There are some great people out there, performing restoration miracles on the historic vehicle circuit. With luck, I'll have a steering wheel that is looking like new early in 2018.
  22. WANTED - A three spoke steering wheel and centre boss for a WW2 Humber Heavy Utility/Pick Up/Ambulance vehicles based on the Super Snipe chassis. Will consider any condition but ideally one that is intact but in need of some refurbishment.
  23. A small number of Landrover 'Wolf' Ambulances were converted into 130 Double Cab Pick Ups with soft tops to the cab and sent out to the British Army Training Unit in Kenya. Dispatched from the UK in commercial white paint and, as we can see, were repainted with a local camouflage scheme in Kenya. Project HEBE saw DSG Colchester convert additional Landrover 'Wolf' Ambulances into 130 Double Cab Pick Ups with hard tops to the cab for British Army units, painted in NATO green. 'HEBE' is not an abbreviation but was named after the Greek goddess for youth, rebirthing these vehicles and giving them further useful service life.
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