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TankNutUK

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    15
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About TankNutUK

  • Rank
    Private

Personal Information

  • Location
    Bristol, United Kingdom
  • Interests
    Vehicle Restoration and Military History
  • Occupation
    Engineer

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    TankNutUK@gmail.com

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491 profile views
  1. How Many Humber 4x4 Utilities are there ?

    Dave, Click the "Activity" tab and then select "Search", on the right. Once the screen has refreshed, you will see two tabs "Contents Search" and "Member Search". After selecting "Member Search", type in "Anzac" into the search field. Of the three results...Alec is the one who joined in 2007. Send him a message. Hope that helps, Alan
  2. Dave, The Humber Heavy Utility register is held by Alec Small, on here as "Anzac". I don't believe this vehicle has survived in preservation. My understanding puts M4895246 as a vehicle from contract S.239 awarded in June 1942. Alan
  3. How Many Humber 4x4 Utilities are there ?

    Dave, You need to speak to Alec Small. He is on here as "Anzac".
  4. Humber heavy utility

    Roger, Click the "Activity" tab and then select "Search", on the right. Once the screen has refreshed, you will see two tabs "Contents Search" and "Member Search". After selecting "Member Search", type in "Anzac" into the search field. Of the three results...Alec is the one who joined in 2007. Send him a message. Hope that helps, Alan
  5. Humber heavy utility

    Roger, The wartime Humbers came in a number of 4x2 and 4x4/FWD Heavy Utility, Pickup and Ambulance variants. A number of forum members own FWD Heavy Utility vehicles. Some on the road with others under restoration but they don't come up for sale very often. There is a register of known surviving Humber Utility vehicles managed by Alec Small (on this forum as "Anzac"). I suggest that you contact him. Regards, Alan
  6. Can anyone help identify this mysterious antenna base? It was found roof mounted on the rear of a post-war (1950s/60s) British Army softskin vehicle? The spring should be vertical. Unfortunately all cabling had already been removed. The curved base looks suspicious. Could this possibly be for an aircraft antenna? Used for ground to air communications perhaps? I'd be grateful for any information. Many thanks. Alan
  7. Webbing afair...

    Looks like a lineman's or rigger's belt for climbing poles or other structures when erecting communications cables. Picture off the internet, shows a US signaller but British and Commonwealth troops needed to do the same job:
  8. Morris C8 Quad

    Great model Brooky. I agree with Whittingham warrior that military model making was what bit many of us with the military vehicle bug and even led to buying 1:1 scale examples! I often suggest that before embarking on a restoration project, build one or more models of the chosen subject and learn all about how it is constructed and assembled. Much easier in 1:35 or even 1:72 scales than with the real thing. Good luck with your next project.
  9. WANTED - Humber Steering Wheel

    Thanks for your suggestions MatchFuzee. I have a broken steering wheel and have been following up on a couple of leads. I am now in contact with both the Post Vintage Humber Car Club and Steering Wheel Restoration Services. There are some great people out there, performing restoration miracles on the historic vehicle circuit. With luck, I'll have a steering wheel that is looking like new early in 2018.
  10. WANTED - A three spoke steering wheel and centre boss for a WW2 Humber Heavy Utility/Pick Up/Ambulance vehicles based on the Super Snipe chassis. Will consider any condition but ideally one that is intact but in need of some refurbishment.
  11. Wolf Paint Schemes

    A small number of Landrover 'Wolf' Ambulances were converted into 130 Double Cab Pick Ups with soft tops to the cab and sent out to the British Army Training Unit in Kenya. Dispatched from the UK in commercial white paint and, as we can see, were repainted with a local camouflage scheme in Kenya. Project HEBE saw DSG Colchester convert additional Landrover 'Wolf' Ambulances into 130 Double Cab Pick Ups with hard tops to the cab for British Army units, painted in NATO green. 'HEBE' is not an abbreviation but was named after the Greek goddess for youth, rebirthing these vehicles and giving them further useful service life.
  12. Berlin Brigade Challengers

    A quick search of the internet shows that the White Cross of a Green Background is now used as the symbol for 'First Aid' equipment because the UK agreed to comply with ISO 7010 in 2012; for all graphical safety signage. https://www.iso.org/standard/54432.html The European Union adopted it as EN ISO 7010 and the UK implemented it through BS EN ISO 7010, replacing the previous regulation BS 5499. I'm no lawyer but I guess that is why everyone in the UK has to use the new symbols.
  13. Camouflage Net Ties

    Having a clear out and found a small quantity of plastic 'zip' ties for attaching foliage squares to camouflage nets: - 32x New, Sand for desert camouflage nets. - 3x New, Black for woodland camouflage nets. - 14x Used (ie bent), Black for woodland camouflage nets. Believe they are British Army issue from 1990s and need to go to somebody who can use them. PM me.
  14. When you really need a Stolly to get home

    Just the vehicle for getting around and the island life. I wonder what condition it is in after all that salt in the Scottish sea air?!
  15. buried and abandoned tanks

    The leading energy behind Operation Nightingale is Dr Diarmaid Walshe (serving in the Royal Army Medical Corps) who is a Project Manager within the Defence Archeological Group, also working closely with the Wessex Archeology. LinkedIn: https://uk.linkedin.com/in/diarmaid-walshe-19b92918 I have his current work contact details. PM me. I believe the 'Richard' who is mentioned is Richard Osgood, Senior Historic Adviser to the MOD's Defence Infrastructure Organisation (DIO). LinkedIn: https://uk.linkedin.com/in/richard-osgood-492b9552 Dare say we can track Richard down if needed.
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