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fv1609

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Everything posted by fv1609

  1. fv1609

    CVRT Repair Manuals sought........

    Mark I assume it is J60 you are after, you will not find the engine in detail in EMER TRACKED VEHICLES as you might expect but in EMER POWER S 570-579. I have these in microfiche but there is a printed version here: https://www.greenmachinesurplus.com/cvrtcvrwj60-petrol-engine-emers-211-p.asp
  2. fv1609

    FV series Locks and Keys

    Richard I did the same as you in my Humber ISPLs but couldn't find anything either, not even for Hornet. Although the CES does list the ignition key for the FV1613 (Pig Ambulance) & as an ignition & door key for the FV1604A (Wireless Light). Given that the barrel has a role in the ignition switch & a door lock, I don't think it would be catalogued in LV6/MT4 as it is not exclusively an electrical item but would be a hardware item in LV6/MT13. I've looked through all the UHBs for all variants of Humber from 1953 to the final one in 1960 with final 5 amendments & they all make reference on the procedure for using the key in the switchboard. I thought we had been here before & we seem to have had similar conclusions:
  3. fv1609

    FV series Locks and Keys

    Looking at the CES for all Humber variants & at varying times. The use of an ignition barrel lock is quite rare. The only examples that I can find are: FV1604A "Keys, ignition door. For replacement demand - Keys Blank to F.V. series of Lock Barrel and to Part No. LV6/MT13/87149" FV1613 "Keys ignition" "Key, lock" turns up many times but the part no. is for the square tapered T handled key. I once ordered a replacement FV key on line but although the key was to a FV pattern, it was a civilian pattern similar to the FS, FP series that bore no relationship to the military FV series.
  4. I've often found door accessories from coach builders like this: https://transport.albert-jagger.co.uk/our-products/handles-locks-latches
  5. Obviously it included a lot of Humber commonality but being a 1962 document had a lot identical items that were now NATO codified, whereas the same parts used in other Humbers were mainly VAOS catalogued items back in the 1960 documents. Often sellers of books pay little regard to the WO/Army No. so if you are hunting by title using words like Hornet, Humber, Malkara, FV1620 you will have no success. The title description is Launcher, Guided Missile, Truck Mounted.
  6. Yes it is WO Code No.13606. I had a spare original & photocopy, but I think they got sold at give away prices before I moved
  7. Yes & it even has a circuit diagram. I had a spare copy which I sold some years ago but I remember people haggling that they could buy a pristine copy. I had to point out that this was original for sale, not a scanned print to order & that is was cheaper than the print to order copy! Furthermore the print to order copy I believe does not include the 5 supplements that include the Malkara support vehicles. Incidentally this list doesn't include all the Humbers, the Hornet FV1620 list is a whole volume to itself although there is quite a bit of commonality.
  8. That is good value, yours is £10 cheaper than buying a photocopied version from one of the usual manual outlets which I don't think has the Malkara support supplements that yours has.
  9. Pete I hear what you are saying about technical training at school, I wish I could have benefited but it was not on offer. I became a licensed radio amateur receiving no help from school or the few radio amateurs I had briefly met. My journey was entirely self-training by reading, listening on the short wave bands, learning how to build things & take things apart, that gave me enough knowledge to pass the City & Guilds Radio Amateur's Exam in 1963. At school there was a lot of emphasis on compulsory worship (as Prince Buster would say 7 days a week & twice on Sundays), compulsory sport & compulsory military training. Generating a long term revulsion to these things, although there is a paradox here. My first entanglement with military publications was to seek out the Combined Cadet Force Regulations 1955 & challenge the legal basis of being compelled to go on an annual camp & indeed my membership of the organisation that I deeply detested. Little did I realise some many many decades later that publications such as that would be something that I would collect, to such an extent that I perhaps have one of the largest privately owned collections of British military publications. Just as well I wasn't forced to study the structure & management of these publications as that would presumably have really stunted any interest in them! With very little automotive experience, whatever knowledge I have gained with MVs has been largely self-taught by having things go wrong. Although infuriating & depressing at the time, when enough things go wrong you gain experience that you can pass onto others who mistakenly think you are knowledgeable! I've picked up lots of advice from others along the way, but also seen gaps or errors in available information/advice particularly in vehicle electrics. But there are always things to learn & great satisfaction to be gained in solving a problem for oneself or another enthusiast wherever they might be in the learning experience. For a long time now radio amateur clubs have run courses to teach people how to become radio amateurs, the original concept of "self-training in wireless telegraphy" seems to have been lost. These days people want access to things straight-away, I think it would be quite unusual for someone to become licensed without having been on one of these, sometimes very short courses to obtain a rudimentary class of licence. So there is in this modern ipad world the 'I want it now' with minimum effort view on everything in life & with the lack of inquisitiveness & manual dexterity many traditional hobbies will faire badly I fear.
  10. My interest in MVs had nothing to do with the experiences of my parents in WW2. In fact my mother tried to steer me away from toy guns & encourage me to follow my father's interest in making '0' Gauge locomotives. (Not playing with model locos but making them ie lathe & metal casting) It was not of great interest to me, so my mother tried to get me interested in things like collecting butterflies & that didn't work! But playing with Meccano & government surplus stuff like Tele D, 38 Sets & mine detectors blossomed into amateur radio. In later years amateur radio blossomed into operating from a Land Rover, albeit a civilian one but even that was horrifying enough to my mother who didn't like seeing the spare wheel on the bonnet that had traces of rust. I then drifted into military Land Rovers as I was drawn to their utilitarian functionality. I'm beginning to drift from MVs partly frustrated being unable to get technical articles published because apparently people don't like reading stuff but prefer looking at colour pics of MVs. So drifting back into amateur radio I find that hobby is suffering from a predominance of grey hair with few youngsters drawn into the hobby. It seems to be hobbies that require manual skills, ingenuity & a bit of working out problems for yourself that seem most vulnerable to decline in this day & age?
  11. As we don't seem be allowed to have a Dad's Army this Saturday, here is some alternative entertainment. Any ideas?
  12. fv1609

    Mystery Object No. 203

    Well done Wally yes it is indeed Gen Panel No.2 Mk 1 The heat is coming from the carbon pile regulators & in this instance mostly from the lower one which is voltage the upper being the current.
  13. fv1609

    Mystery Object No. 203

    Unusually for me Wally it is
  14. fv1609

    Mystery Object No. 203

    Richard not a TV set. I'll have to go onto the PC & find a slightly bigger view to see if it helps.
  15. fv1609

    Mystery Object No. 203

    "Is that getting warm?" Very good Steve although it is, it is not lighting related. This incidentally is a thermal image.
  16. fv1609

    Mystery Object No. 203

    In the broadest sense Wally it is a radiator of heat as a by product of what the thing does, but it is not a vehicle engine radiator.
  17. fv1609

    Mystery Object No. 203

    Richard nope but its not a rectifier, although you/it is getting warm. Must go for now.
  18. fv1609

    Mystery Object No. 203

    Nope Wally but it is automotive
  19. fv1609

    Mystery Object No. 203

    I think you mean silicon, you may have had implants on your mind. But not those either. ***There will a short intermission, I have to provide a taxi service for at least an hour**
  20. fv1609

    Mystery Object No. 203

    It isn't Richard but indirectly you are getting warm.
  21. fv1609

    Mystery Object No. 203

    Wally part of it is in a sense a heat exchanger, the heat from the thing is being dissipated to the air. This heat is an unwanted by-product of the operation the main thing, creating heat in itself is not the purpose, most of this bit you can see is trying to get rid of the heat.
  22. fv1609

    Mystery Object No. 203

    Nope Richard not that, no water involvement. I think at some stage you may have seen one of these.
  23. fv1609

    Mystery Object No. 203

    Not a thermos flask Wally nor a catering item as such.
  24. fv1609

    Mystery Object No. 203

    Richard yes heat is involved, but not to do with an army cooker goodness me where do you get these ideas?
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