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fv1609

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About fv1609

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    Field-Marshal
  • Birthday 04/01/1914

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  • Location
    GB-CMN (formerly UK91)
  • Homepage
    http://www.shorlandsite.com/

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  1. Andy is it mainly missiles & aeroplanes? Anything ground based?
  2. Been trying to get hold of this long out of print book for a few years now. Then suddenly they pop up from around the world! I had to get this one from Germany as it was the cheapest. Not that cheap, but when you consider the original price & allow for inflation it is not unreasonable. It is a mixture of historical record with a catalogue of PRO files on the entangled intricacies of the War Office. It is an extremely complex subject, which I doubt I could ever fully grasp. It is useful to dive into to follow such things as the comings & goings of the War Department, which in common culture is thought to be interchangeable with the War Office, which it ain't. It describes the early development of the Ministry of Defence, which in one national MV magazine is stated to have been formed in 1964, which is tosh! You can also trace the fortunes of the Secretary-at-War & the Secretary of State for War which are not the same offices at all. Some of the histories are distillations of periodic summaries in certain editions of the War Office List (not to be confused with Army List) I have quite a few of these & have I think spotted an error about the War Department that is trumped by a statute I have from 1880ish that annoyingly I can't find now.
  3. These variants have cropped up before, said to be RE Airfield Damage Repair (ADR) Recce Saracens
  4. I notice that site isn't too clever, they say a Humber Pig APC was FV1601
  5. I would think that the purpose of the earthed shielding is two fold. 1. To minimise the radiation of the oscillator and its harmonics that drives the inverter supplementing the RF filtering within the lighting units. So minimising RFI to nearby comms equipment & I suppose reduce a permanent RF signature to an enemy who might be able to detect activity in an otherwise closed down situation in the battlefield. 2. To minimise the pick up stray RF fields or EMP that may be present in the vicinity & cause voltage fluctuations or damage to the lighting units.
  6. VAOS (Vocabulary of Army Ordnance Stores) Section LV7 covers components that are peculiar to British vehicles that are of non-standard design ie not to WO design. I have quite a few VAOS LV7 from various years & I can find no vehicle manufacturer with the code GB. However GB, not surprisingly, is the code for identifying components made by Girling Brakes that are listed only in VAOS Sections LV6 MT1 - MT15. Components in these sections are applicable to more than one vehicle type. The Section LV6MT9 includes braking components. I believe that the spring has been wrongly catalogued as LV7/GB and should have been identified as LV6MT9/GB I find that it was later NATO codified as 2530-99-936-4716 looking at the earlier identifier is given as LV6MT9/GB41241, which confirms my suspicion. So this could fit more than one vehicle type & I see was also used by Malaysia.
  7. Yes I know all about loose wheel nuts! Having got my Shorland roadworthy 30+ years ago I took it for its first trip, some 45 miles to an event at Bovington Tank Museum. I was rather bugged by a rattling that I thought was caused by the turret, I stopped in a few lay-bys but could see nothing amiss. I had nearly arrived at Bovington, but on the roundabout at Bere Regis there was a loud crash & I found I was sitting in an undriveable 3-wheeler as I watched the NS rear wheel roll into a hedge. Fellow motorists were none too pleased as I climbed out in a dazed panic wondering how to move it. After a few minutes Neville Anderson deputy curator of the Tank Museum drove by in his Land Rover & invited me to hop in. So a recovery team was organised by way of George Alexander's wrecker with a gang of helpers. The Shorland was recovered to the traffic island, the wheel was affixed by the remaining bits of thread left on the studs. In the workshops "Chatty" Taylor MIGed the nuts on & I was able to return home later that day on 4 wheels again. So since then I have had an eye for loose wheel nuts!
  8. fv1609

    Shorland

    Winston a few more that a friend found on Facebook for me.
  9. fv1609

    Shorland

    Winston, I believe this Shorland was the one that resided in the GNR museum, that held an annual open day when it was brought out for display. Unfortunately it seemed to end up as a gate guardian & mechanically went down hill being left out as water easily flows in from the turret. Wherever it has been someone has tried to sex it up by painting it green & putting SHORLAND on the side & covering the inside with white paint. The turret fixtures look rather silly, the hand spot-lamp is wrong, it was a spotlight linked to the GPMG & its sighting periscope. The tubes depicting smoke dischargers don't make the grade I'm afraid as you can see from the real thing below. But they can easily be changed. Shorts would have supplied it ready painted to the customer's requirement, so this gloss bluey-grey is the correct colour. Bear in mind this was not an army vehicle where green is expected but for a gendarmerie who would have internal security duties particularly in an urban setting grey would be best although they could make themselves seen with the blue light & heard with the siren under the bonnet. Note this is in complete contrast to the RUC Shorlands that were green & never grey as they were for IS duties in rural areas not a riot control vehicle. Yes compromises have to be made if it means it prolongs the active life of the vehicle. I'm ashamed to confess that the rear steel floor of the boot (trunk) of mine was secured by countersunk Whitworth screws. They were all rusted in & required much ingenuity & effort to remove, I have replaced them with flat headed metric screws into Rivnuts. This means one person can easily remove the floor & gain access to awkward areas of the chassis & cabling. Although not original I justify it on the grounds that it increases the chance of the vehicle being properly maintained. No Rivnut counters have yet spotted this apparent travesty!
  10. 00BK36, 02BK87 & 18BK90 were FV1601 upgraded to FV1623 upgraded to FV1624 and were sold off in July 1971. 02BK87 was sold in error having been previously withdrawn from sale. The selling price is not recorded but 00BK36 sold for £90 & 11BK90 for £50. 02BK87 (below) was purchased I believe by Mike Goodman who was invited to sell it back to the MOD an invitation that he declined. For missile test purposes these vehicles had the same control & guidance systems fitted to Hornets., this equipment was considered sacrificial to be used in Hornets (in the same way that the system was backed up by Humber variants so that a B60 engine could be used to keep a Hornet operational - a point that seems to have been missed with the later introduction of Land Rovers to replace some Humber roles.) I can only guess that some of this equipment perhaps had not been removed entirely as much of the control system for Malkara was replicated in Swingfire and considered sensitive? Here is an extract from Max Richard's Humber Register of 1988 That must have been a crossed wires confusion on the day of the auction. The other error at a higher level that comes to mind is that despite the start of Operation Banner in August 1969 & by late 1971 there were about 200 Pigs in service in NI of these 139 had needed second line repairs. But even during 1971 Pigs & Humbers GS were still being sold off at Ruddington. To then start buying them back about 200 in early 1972. As for bits in the backs of vehicles, I am told that many of the early Pigs that were sold had rear wheel stations in bits chucked in the back, no doubt with Chobham joint problems. A forewarning of the problems that were to come with a fleet of near 500 Pigs at any one time 80 Pigs were off the road with wheel station problems.
  11. Yes you have volts feeding the distributor. Put a bulb on this feed with the other end to earth & with the points open it will light up. Presumably when you use your screwdriver the light will go out. But what happens when you close the points by rotating the distributor or cranking? The light should go out, if it doesn't then the points aren't closing or there is some break in the connection at the earth or the pivot post that supports the points is not free to move fully. If it is stiff it may not allow the points to relax & close fully.
  12. fv1609

    Shorland

    Winston you will have seen my remarks above & no doubt compared your pictures with those on the Shorland Site. The liberal use of white paint being used to side step the lack of the Dunlop 'Trakmark' lining. That aside, it looks in very good condition. I do hope you are successful & being LHD for you & no doubt its age will allow it to be imported. The GNR Shorlands were originally fitted with two radio systems. VHF - Storno CQM 632 HF - Racal Syncal TRA-921 this was a manpack radio but boosted with a 100 watt linear amplifier for AM/SSB with a manually operated aerial tuning unit Racal MA-942 There was also an intercom amplifier integrated with the radios using Larkspur accessories with a RSB2 control harness box & a type C junction box. Your Shorland appears to have Clansman units to perform this task, whether that was a genuine upgrade I don't know. Given that the Trakmark lining was stripped away or had deteriorated so badly it is unlikely that these were the original units. But anyway that is only a minor issue. The GNR used the 7.62 GPMG & fired either CS or smoke from the dischargers. If you do get it I beg of you to keep it as original as you can. To be marked up in GNR livery would be quite a head turner. I know an owner can do just what they like with their own vehicle & why should they listen to anyone else poking their nose in? But I have seen so many Shorlands ruined by the owner turning it into a fantasy vehicle. It's sad enough to see a Land Rover or Jeep turned into something strange, but there are enough of those around for it not to be the end of the world. But there are very few Shorlands to play around with. The thing is any owner may not keep a vehicle for the rest of their life. The novelty may wear off or something more fascinating may come along that needs to be funded. Selling a vehicle that is pretty much original will command a far higher price than one that has been turned into something of the owner's fancy. The owner may well feel proud of their embellishments but a buyer may just cringe & walk away or it only realises part of the value it would have as an authentic vehicle. Sorry I have gone on a bit there & don't mean to insult your motives. Good luck
  13. Sparking at the points is not actually desirable, it is the Back EMF of about 300v from the primary circuit as it opens. The job of the condenser is to minimise the spark to encourage an abrupt switch off & collapse of the magnetic field to promote a high back EMF in both primary & secondary windings that add together (if the coil is designed for that polarity). But I grant you it is some sign of life. What voltage do you get with the points closed & the ignition on? If there is still voltage it means the points aren't making electrical contact, when you come with the screwdriver you are doing the job of the points. So it suggests there might be something in the distributor mechanism not allowing the points to make proper contact when there are meant to be closed.
  14. An aberration of the Queens Royal West Surrey?
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