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  1. 2 points
    I replied to a earlier thread on this subject and at that time could not add any thing to it other than what i knew at that time since then l have been put to gether a list of RAF MU's AAW's AVD BVD RVD and there locations several things have come to light concerning the numbers allocated to them one location can have two or three different numbers on the same site or in a area covered by one area command BURN near YORK and BARLOW near SELBY had the same 41 AVD were is this taking us well up to now with what i already knew i have found one hundred locations and B42 was located at WALLINGTON in the uk ps at the same time DIAMOND Ts were under going rebuilds at the same time
  2. 1 point
    Having gathered together sufficient parts to make a start over the last year, I am at last ready to commence the restoration of Thornycroft J type No. 2393 of 1915. This chassis was recovered from beneath an old chalet in Skegness and thus protected has survived in remarkably good order. It was discovered and recovered by Graham Hand and passed on to John Marshall, who began to add parts as they became available, but was concentrating on his front runner J type 2282 also of 1915. It is great to find a chassis, particularly one in good condition, but the icing on the cake would be an engine and I became aware of the existence of a collection of Thornycroft parts in Sydney Australia. These parts from various models had been rescued from an auction having failed to attract any bidders and I soon discovered the new owner, Ian Browning was willing to move them on, providing I took on the whole collection. This was more than I wanted, but I decided to go for it and with the blessing of the Australian Government, I made arrangements to export a container load of rusty metal from the other side of the world. Ian took on the job of packing and loading in temperatures of 40 degrees which can't have been pleasant ( Thanks mate !) and after a 3 month voyage I took delivery at Southampton. The haul included 2 chassis (one 'X' one 'J') two M4 engines, one fairly complete, the other less so and various other hard to find parts. The chassis were just post war with no numbers visible. After a hard life hauling loads on Australian roads they were put to work again as farm trailers and further abused until abandoned and rescued for preservation. I had little interest in the rare X type parts,( being a lighter weight export model) and after considerable wrangling managed to swap these and the tired J chassis for the current 1915 project. I now have temporary accommodation which is secure if a little draughty on the Ox/ Bucks border. Anyone with workshop space in this area and/or an interest in helping with this project please shout ! I am also seeking parts including a gearbox, water pump and Diff gear. Regards, Tomo .
  3. 1 point
    Thanks for the heads up Nick, I've just booked in my Norton 16H & Ariel WNG
  4. 1 point
    On a decoy airfield:- The flare path was almost 1km long made up of lights spaced approx. 100m apart. To prevent friendly aircraft attempting to land on the non-existent runway, each end had a bar of hooded red lights, only visible at low level. There are links to some very interesting sites at the bottom of the page:- https://www.moors-valley.co.uk/learning/decoy-bunker/
  5. 1 point
    I agree it is a matter of proportion, but someone else may read the post and think it is OK to dump an IBC full down the drain. Great work on the trucks they will look factory fresh when you are finished.
  6. 1 point
    Images of war: Special forces vehicles: 1940 to the present day.
  7. 1 point
    I found a copy of Munitions of War, BSA and Daimler on-line at the University of Calgary Library. Unfortunately, I couldn't find a way to download the entire book, but could read it page-by-page. Thus I was able to copy about 30 pages of material on Thornycroft vehicles by copying one page at a time. This is not as tedious as it sounds and took me only about 15 minutes. http://contentdm.ucalgary.ca/digital/collection/cmh/id/106331 Bosun Al
  8. 1 point
    Like this '32 BB but with a different cab configuration
  9. 1 point
    The one at the front centre could possibly be an early thirties Ford, maybe a BB, the bigger version of this;
  10. 1 point
    Evening All, For various reasons I have achieved jack since my last post but this afternoon I managed to finally complete and connect all the brake, steering linkages. How efficiently it will all work, is yet to be seen and I still have to machine the ratchet teeth into the quadrants. Jon
  11. 1 point
    Evening All, After my last post, fate intervened and stopped me getting to the victory show or really achieving much at all, however on Friday I decided to do something to take my mind off of life. I have started tackling the steering brake mechanism, obviously it's not going to perfectly replicate the original but I will make it look as near to the original set up as I can. I still need to machine the ratchet teeth in but I will wait until the whole mechanism is bolted in place, to see where they need to go, Jon
  12. 1 point
    Try 1/4 Unf and look on eBay.
  13. 1 point
    Tested Spring in Tividale Birmingham. Theyve done all sorts for me. Including Aveling safety valve springs
  14. 1 point
    Looks good @Samro nice to see an intact Triad 32 😜
  15. 1 point
    Belzona is excellent, and used in heavy industry. MoD use it and I have used it successfully in all sorts of applications. regards Richard
  16. 1 point
    The correct colour is Sky Blue EMER WORKSHOPS Chapter 3. Paints in Service Use. Table 1 H1/8010-99-943-4730 Paint, Finishing, Heat Resisting, High Gloss, Sky Blue BSC 101, Brushing
  17. 1 point
    well done thanks for sharing your photos it helps to inspire all of us who are doing the same thing
  18. 1 point
    OK Lex....Her name is Judith. Ron
  19. 1 point
    Yes, thanks again for your help. I had asked many 'knowledgeable' people about the problem over the last two years to no avail. I posted the original question more as a last resort. I hope our paths cross one day. Jeff
  20. 1 point
    I care as it is the way it should be done.
  21. 0 points
    Just a daft thought but could a set of brakes operating between the steering box and final drives work? It would give you a main brake and the pedal would not be a dummy. If that makes sense. Fantastic work Jon!
  22. 0 points
    Hi have been doing a bit just got reverse gear back now to see if it works
  23. 0 points
    Just drove this ex military ambulance from mid-Norway to the uk. It’s a 1968 Volvo Laplander.
  24. 0 points
  25. 0 points
    "Dig for Victory" Day 1 - Thursday - August 29th Here's the first few pictures of Beamish, taken on Thursday 29th - our first day. After packing "Jessie" ( still in Ordnance Depot markings ) and the trailer with as much camping gear as would fit, we set off for the 10 mile trip to the Beamish Open Air Museum in County Durham. We arrived around 11am and although we had missed the briefing that day, we bumped into the organiser on the way in and he cleared us to drive around as we'd been before. Rather than helping with the tents, daughter cleared off with a friend shortly after we got there and I was left to set up camp next to some friends who were already there. I had a 10ft and 12ft ridge tent with a gap between for cooking. This was covered by an old canvas fly sheet that I'd spent the previous day painting with shed paint, interrupted frequently by rain. Each tent had a small pop up tent inside for an extra layer of warmth and draughed proofing. The rest of our camp was made up with Andy and Derek in pup tents. Derek brought his Jeep. Chris has his brother's GMC and his own Dodge WC51. Neil brought his GMC and had the fire we all gathered around each evening. Paul also had his Jeep, but he was staying in his camper in the staff car park. Last year I attended the show Friday to Sunday and travelled each day. This year we decided to camp, but it was complicated by the fact that the two Jeeps couldn't carry everything and Lynne needed to work on Thursday and part of Friday. Daughter also had a party to on Saturday! Lynne planned to call in and collect us on her way home from work on Thursday. We would go home, eat, collect some more stuff and take the second Jeep back to Beamish. Lynne would join us later on Friday. So the morning of day one was really just a set up day, 'though I got to play out in the Jeep during the afternoon. So not as many photo opportunities. This is a feature that makes the Beamish event special, the freedom to drive or convoy around the site freely.
  26. 0 points
    This is possibly the best site for keeping track of where tanks are http://the.shadock.free.fr/Surviving_Panzers.html
  27. 0 points
    Have added additional information on the Acumen and Mansfield pillion seats. Original text has been edited... Jan
  28. 0 points
  29. 0 points
    Hi, Had the same problem myself. I modified the seat and found the seeting position comfortable. Fate had it the I had a health problem and lost a lot of weight, so I bought a replacement. I've still got the modified seat if your interested. Wouldn't want much for it, but being a odd shape, i'm not sure how much shipping would be.
  30. 0 points
    Good idea! And if they are no good, I can charge w+p £250!😀
  31. 0 points
    It been a busy time here in the wild west involving preparations to get the D15 frame and various other large lumps and brackets moved into the barn, de-greased and generally made ready for the media blaster arrival. Here's the frame transported from the workshop to the barn strapped to my WW2 Canadian 10cwt trailer, ( another project when I get the time) for now doing stealing service around the farm Now set up on trestles and piled up with brackets and frame fixings spring bushes have been blanked off using threaded rod and suitably sized washers the spring brackets have then been fully de-greased. I'm probably telling people to suck eggs here but for those who are contemplating media blasting for the first time blasting over greasy surfaces has two effects the first the grease will absorb energy from the blast media making the job harder and longer secondly and more importantly the oils and fats will be driven into the grain boundaries of the steel and will result in poor paint adhesion during the re-painting process A pallet of wheel rims, I use polythene tube warmed up and pushed onto the studs to protect the threads from the effects of media blasting, if required they will be cleaned up using a wire brush and then a dia and thread cutting paste. And last but not least hubs, drums and rear axle case all vents and openings have been blanked and taped shut oil drained and de-greased, only the outside of the drums will be media blasted the inside will be done with a rotary wire brush once blasted and painted the rear axle will be completely stripped and rebuilt. Pete
  32. 0 points
    More metal bashing.... Just waiting for some heavy gauge bar to arrive so I can finish the spare wheel carrier., then the jerry can support on the near side after that is all the pipe work (and supports) for the taps (Still looking for pumps and filters)
  33. 0 points
    The crankcase first had a good scrape followed by a rotary wire brushing. Pics by Stan. This revealed a couple of interesting things, firstly original machining marks, still there under a light coating of rust. Not often seen in English restorations ! sSecondly we think this may be the mark of the engine builder in Australia. It is made up of letter ' I ' stamps, formed into a 'W'. Whoever he was, he made a good job and much of his work will run again, 70 odd years down the line. Having got the outside sharpened up, it was time to get stuck in to the black hole within. Note, it would have been better to start here. This was proper minging !
  34. 0 points
    From Neglected to Newark. I haven’t posted on here for a long time because sadly I have been busy or was doing other things to make time for my big old girl. Fortunately I had a spur of spirit and set myself a target to get her to the AEC show so with 6 weeks to go I set about everything that needed doing to make her roadworthy. And at the end of the 6 weeks I was happy she was fit for the road. So me tired beyond compare after weeks and weeks or AM finished after work I left for the show at 6:20 am up all the A roads and arrived at 9:17 with no problems. Brilliant time at the show and made it back with no troubles but a numb arse. Looking forward to finishing her off now and getting her all painted up hopefully she’ll be done for Christmas and going to shows next year
  35. 0 points
    On the 31st, our two Jeeps went out for an evening tour of some of the local airfields. The first stop was Eye airfield, Station 134. This was the home to the 490th Bomb Group. My last visit to the airfield was in 2012, but since then, a new memorial has built, being unveiled almost exactly three years before our current visit. Our first stop on our little convoy, was to this new memorial on the East side of the airfield, located very close to one of the wartime underground fuel stores.
  36. 0 points
    I've had a busy week, went down to Duxford on Tuesday and then silageing the rest of the week. I did lay the original pattern transmission cover plates on the chassis to get an idea of how they sat there is a 3rd part that sits between and to the rear which incorporates the mounting position of the air cleaner and the stowage for the stone wear jar for distilled water. The front half of the left plate will be cut away to allow the belts from the PTO to pass up to the dynamos above. Also I collected the straps from my engineer that hold the gear lever base to the torque tube. I was just going to get the machining done but with about 5 to 6 weeks until harvest and still a lot of work to do on the body I decided to get them to do the whole job. Peter.
  37. 0 points
    Hi have been doing a little we managed to source a radiator thats copy quality the old one got mislaid. on inspection of the stuck gearbox which we knew had no reverse we found it had no plug in it was dry and had a rats nest in it. So after a rinse it was filled with oil and left to soak a few days latter we put a spanner on the top shaft and with gentle rocking after an afternoon it came free. It’s now off getting a new gear cut. The gear appears quite fragile over the drive key after allowing for the depth of teeth refers to pics there is not a lot left. the reverse idler the loose gear and shaft in pics is constant mesh and had sized we suspect causing the breakage it had wiped out bearing material that had splayed out and jammed it on the case it took quite a lot of getting out
  38. 0 points
    Well, we are still doing odds and ends whilst we try to keep a lot of other balls in the air. Going to drop one sooner or later but in the meantime the lorry is a making a little progress. Dad is still working on the chains. They are a tedious job and best attacked in small doses. I wanted to get the pistons out so I can have a look at making some new ones. Big end is fairly conventional. A bit of contortionism! And off it came. No wobble or wear. A really nice joint. I wish the last owner had taken a bit more care. There is no wear at all, just two broken castings! Actually, the castings are amazingly thin. They are iron and only around 1/16" thick. I don't expect that mine will be quite so light. Lubrication to the big ends is by splash in this engine. See the big holes at the sides of the journal to let the oil in. The magneto bracket has been annoying be. It looks as if it has taken a bash and bent the crank case. I set about taking it off with some coaxing and oil. Off it came. The base plate is broken but replaceable. The best bit was that the crank case casting isn't bent so that is a win. On the other hand, i tried to unscrew a bolt from a boss on the side of the case and it split. I think it was cracked already but it is a real nuisance and will take some sorting. On to the governor on the other side. A lot of it is missing but the basic mechanism is still there. # With the cover off, there is a lever carrying a yoke. The yoke sits on these two pins which push it back and forth, actuated by the bob weights inside. This sping sets the governed speed. It has no adjustment and is set in position by a cross-pin under the washer. Once slid off the shaft, it is again in beautiful condition with no wear. The drive gear spindle has a key along its length which takes the drive for the weights. The gear is in lovely order too. Bob weights removed. The magneto drive gear on the other side is nice too. Dad has picked up the cam followers for a clean and inspection. Again, no wear at all but some corrosion on the rollers. I see these very much as borderline and am deciding whether to replace them. The last three have very corroded tappets. Dad has reached the conclusion that they are a metric fine thread which I find bizarre for an Americn lorry. He has ordered some bolts to try in the holes and will make up some replacements in due course. We want to turn the engine pver and lift the crank next time we get together. Once that is done and the camshafts are out we can get on with creaning and putting it back together. I must get on with the piston pattern. Steve
  39. 0 points
    The last hose was the chassis to axle hose which was rather difficult to remove and refit. The large spanners needed to fit the hose fittings were too big to move in the space available. The chassis fitting also had a bracket with electrical wires running right in front of the access to the pipe fittings. The same wires also restricted access to the bolt head that held the brake pipe bracket and wire support bracket. Eventually I got that bolt undone, freeing the wire and hose bracket which then made the rest of the job fairly easy. I got all the hoses fitted by about 1:30pm, then stopped for lunch. After lunch, I began to top up the extra brake fluid reservoir and started pumping fluid through the system. I went around the four corners three times as during the first attempt, fluid started pouring from the front right wheel. I realised the copper washer had dropped out from behind the brass union and once refitted, held firm. The brake pedal free play was set up next and there was just enough time for a quick test drive before the school run. I didn't have much time, so the drive was short, but the brakes worked well, other than a slight pull to the right. The free play remained unchanged and the pedal was firm and consistent throughout. Tomorrow I'll adjust the shoes to try and balance the braking and there's the usual Spring work, such as cleaning and gapping the plugs and points etc. The first trip out for the Dodge will probably be in a couple of weeks to Blyth Battery. Here's the four old hoses.
  40. 0 points
    Advise owner to sell it and get a Dodge. 😁😁 For specalist parts Jeeparts or Dallas Auto parts. Though you should expect lots of Land Rover queries.
  41. 0 points
    Call Me cynical, But I wonder how long it will be. Before this gentleman is Burgled? I am of the opinion that anything in Newspapers is really not good in this Hobby. & related equipment subjects. The press normally revile such things & call us inappropriate titles. Just because we wish to enjoy & preserve historical items like vehicles & weapons. The Press rarely portrays anything positive in these Fields. Or am I wrong here?.....Just my thoughts.
  42. 0 points
    Now back after a thorough session at A & C Soda blasters and it's time to get stuck in. First task was to remove the front axle which has been reversed since the chassis was 'trailerized'. The opportunity then presented itself to remove the front springs and strip down to clean up the leaves. The offside spring is original Thornycroft with cut down replacement leaves fitted presumably during field service repairs in France. This spring came apart readily and was cleaned up and greased between the leaves. The nearside one is a later replacement and bears a makers stamp WS & S and a date of 1926. This is interesting and would seem to indicate further road work before taking up duties as a caravan chassis. Although not blown out with rust, this spring was completely frozen and each leaf required individual attention after drilling out the centre pin in small bites. All shackle pins had suffered badly from lubricant starvation and will need replacement. Just one original grease cap has survived. The axle bears a cast mark KF for Kirkstal Forge in Leeds and is also stamped M (for military? )
  43. 0 points
    I have also made an (almost complete) fake ration for display purposes, I have since made a packet of nuts&raisins and a packet of those boiled sweets! Yes it really is all fake! the Biscuits Brown were tricky to copy because of the green foil, so I made do with green wrapping paper, which is slightly sparkly! lol
  44. 0 points
    Whilst everyone was enjoying a Boxing Day sleep in I decided to clean up the barrel and breech ring to see if both would match up. Spent a good amount of time cleaning up the interrupted screw threads as these were caked with grease and grit. Surprisingly once I got everything straight and level i simply wheeled the jack forward, twisted the barrel and that was that. Still some cleaning up to do then hopefully will be mounted back into the turret in the next week or so.
  45. 0 points
    As you say, this part of the chassis should not be under great stress, particularly if the bolts / rivets have not been loose. However the Goslings' J was cracked in almost the same place. I wonder if it could be a result of weakness caused by the manufacturing process ? And why only the LH chassis rail ? David
  46. 0 points
  47. 0 points
    You may remember about 20 years ago while in California we were introduced to an old boy who used to drive a Peerless fuel tanker as an eleven year old while his dad took a nap. I understand that he could not reach the pedals but would wake his dad up when necessary. The fuel business was purchased and as part of the deal the Peerless was broken up and scrapped apart from the chassis which was used to level ground when it was towed behind a tractor and the radiator which was kept as a souvenir. In LA we met with the eleven year old (now in his 90's) who still had the radiator which he sold to us. it is in super condition and wont need much attention before fitting. Peerless rad 2.bmp
  48. 0 points
    Congratulations Mark always an exciting moment when that hoped for vehicle arrives in terms of parts supplies you really have a very wide choice for a jeep these days. I would suggest you do a little web research it's all part of the learning curve you have a choice of 4 major outlets in the UK, and any number of well known suppliers from Holland, Belgium and France that's before you start to look at suppliers in the US, just remember that non EU countries will carry a not inconsequential import tax. I'm purposefully not naming names as I don't believe one is better than all the others it's a case of mix and match depending on the size of your pocket and what you ultimately want to achieve. The most important thing to keep in mind is that it's your truck and you can do with it as you wish and don't be afraid of asking questions on any of the forums that's what their there for. regards Pete
  49. 0 points
    Shortly after these pictures were taken, the speaker and mount were removed to give the mount a couple of coats of varnish to seal the wood. It will be refitted later once it has had time to fully cure.
  50. 0 points
    Hi Tony it does look a very nice restoration, it appears to be missing its data plates so if anybody has the museums contact details I will willingly send them my plates and other parts left over from breaking mine.
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