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Showing content with the highest reputation since 02/13/2012 in Posts

  1. 7 points
    A Genie! Gosh that made me laugh. Nothing quite so exciting really. Here is a picture of the store room.
  2. 4 points
    Sorry, I was not responding to any implied criticism, just my frustration at Photobucket black mailing me. I have just updated page one of the Thornycroft and nearly finished the Peerless thread. There are about a further 4,650 photos for me to replace, so I better get back to it then. Interestingly, these threads still attract a great deal of interest and it would be a shame to loose it all. Very sadly, a great deal of other threads and photos will have been lost. Anyway, normal services will be resumed as soon as possible. .
  3. 3 points
    Hi Ian, They look great, I like the toothed ring for the ABS sensor on the wheel in the middle of the picture 😁. David
  4. 3 points
    Take a look here: https://digitalcommons.unl.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1727&context=tsaconf Dunlop. Neoprene rubber substitute. 'Camouflarge cloth' ....secret. Air Ministry Ballon Section built them, so did Shepperton Studios. Search Google widely and deeply and ye shall reap 'facts'. My interest is Force R, who whilst they were the masters of deception in WW2, were at some point brought back into play for the Cold War ...... certainly in Tripolitania in 1955 and as an overtly Royal Engineer unit were based in at least one regiment's base at one time (Homs, 3RHA) to utilise a new unusualy large purpose built aircraft-type hanger ....on the edge of the parade square to house what is anyone's guess as I can't track much in the archives remotely from the lands unfit for human habitation. I was alerted to Force R by a Veteran of 3RHA who was there and he told me that the unit was based in their camp and that personnel of Force R were not allowed to mix with the troops stationed in Homs as 'their work was secret'. They dressed in quasi-military uniforms and were 'scruffy'! What I have found out officially is that Force R were indeed in Libya to build dummy V Force bomber diversionary airfields in the desert .... as the real RAF Idris was a known diversionary real airfield for when the 'balloon went up'. The thinking is the large hanger was for constructing/inflating dummy aircraft ... the hanger, even I can remember as a child there in 1959-61 was huge and most certainly was big enough to house a blow-up Vulcan or two! Whether there ever were inflatable British jet aircraft at that time, or after I know not. The hanger was not used for anything after 1957 when 3RHA departed, seemingly 'empty' during 6 and 2RTR's time in situ though no other Veteran could tell me what the hanger was used for even if they could remember it being there. So if you know anything about dummy airfields, inflatable aircraft and Cold War deception in Libya, do please sing out.
  5. 3 points
    Yes it sure has! and I think I can Now Confirm that we are all agreed that we like and dislike Guy Martin, Like and Dislike the replica Tank, think that machines and systems are safer in the old days before health and safety and are safer today, we need more and less people in engineering and are pro and anti Europe, want to get rid of people who use their money to push technology forward and also want to keep them. I'm Glad that's all now settled, better close this thread off before it gets out of hand!
  6. 3 points
    Speaking as a forum Admin and IT support guy I can tell you that it is a hugely thankless task keeping these things running. More often than not the Admins are well aware of issues that the end-user is not aware us and in some cases it's a case of holding on and hoping it doesn't go bang before you can get to fix it properly, (surely anyone who has ever had to jury-rig an engine just to get home will sympathise with that). The problem with forums is if they go bang, getting them back is easy (just a quick case of re-installing everything from scratch), getting all the data back is the hard bit. Reaching for your regular back-ups only to find that they too are corrupt is something every IT support Engineer dreads...it is what keeps us up a t night! Sometimes upgrading the software is something that is forced upon us by the forward march of progress. Recently my own forum stopped working and whenever a user posted something all that appeared was an empty post. It soon became obvious that, overnight, the company hosting the forum had upgraded the underlying database software (MySQL) and another essential web component (PHP) to the very latest versions, (they do these upgrades for security reasons, to keep out hackers and those who would embed viruses). Sadly, our Forum software does not work with these new upgrades and so we are being forced to upgrade before we were ready to do so. We now have to make a decision if we stay with the forum software we are using, which was what was being used here before the upgrade, or go another route to keep with the times and to give folks the feature requests they want. I don't know about here but I keep getting asked if I can add 'LIKE' buttons to threads. I can't and the software doesn't allow for it but the newest version does; it's just a case of whether I'm prepared to pay for that or not, especially when paying for the hosting costs is already a burden. Nobody likes change, (all of us here are here precisely because we like the old ways) but sometimes change is forced upon us, for whatever reason, and we just have to learn to deal with it. I appreciate that it gets harder as one gets older (I'm in my mid 50's now and beginning to get very set in my ways) but it is what it is and we need to learn to adjust. You just need to remember that we all come here for the content, the camaraderie and shared enthusiasm for all things historic, military and vehicular... the manner, or format, in which it is presented is less important. Just my two pfennigs!
  7. 2 points
    I'm convinced that a trip to 'the stores' actually involves rubbing a lamp to summon a genie with access to a seemingly inexhaustible supply of obscure 100+ year old lorry parts... 😂
  8. 2 points
    Evening All, I thought that I would do a pre-Christmas update. I have been concentrating on the wiring, a bit odd you may think as there are more pressing jobs with the drive etc but I needed something that wasn't complicated and that I could dip in and out of. I am glad that I did, as there were a lot of holes to drill, clips to make and trunking to run and head scratching to do. There is a section of flexible trunking that runs in front of the driver, around the peddle area. I had thought that it was part of the wiring but I am now not so sure, as I have identified the wiring route and it doesn't use that section of trunking. However I have used it to run the gearbox kickdown switch wiring in, as it runs in the adjacent area. The wiring is now complete and tested but I have made use of a lot more flexible trunking than the original. All the wires in the original appear to be black, I have used colour coded wires but where they can be seen I have jointed onto black extensions. I have left the wires long enough so that they can be pulled out of the end of the trunking so that the various colours can be identified as they join the black ends. The interior of the hull contains light sockets for the magnetic work light as well as adjustable station lights. So far, I have been able to identify the location of two sockets, one by the driver and one in the turret and two station lights, one in the turret and one by the radio operators position. I would have expected to find three of each so I will keep on looking. Work light location next to the driver I posted a question on another forum with refence to the station lights and amazingly one of the various styles is still produced, but for an automotive application. I had to make the work light sockets. The sockets are standard DIN sockets pressed into the housing but the spade connections had to be altered. In situ with the work light plugged in.
  9. 2 points
    I recently had some time to spare at work, so I thought I'd run AP2515A Vol.III, Mechanical Transport Vehicles Complete, dated May 1946 through the scanner. It essentially lists all of the MT vehicles, trailers and associated bodies, in use with the RAF at the time. Interestingly, some of the chassis/complete vehicles have the contract numbers listed and for many of those the chassis number ranges covered by each contract are included. Also included at the end is the first amendment list, from January 1947. If it's of interest, we also have the second edition of May '52 and the fifth edition from April '64 Apologies if there is a better place to put this. AP2515A 1946.pdf
  10. 2 points
    I replied to a earlier thread on this subject and at that time could not add any thing to it other than what i knew at that time since then l have been put to gether a list of RAF MU's AAW's AVD BVD RVD and there locations several things have come to light concerning the numbers allocated to them one location can have two or three different numbers on the same site or in a area covered by one area command BURN near YORK and BARLOW near SELBY had the same 41 AVD were is this taking us well up to now with what i already knew i have found one hundred locations and B42 was located at WALLINGTON in the uk ps at the same time DIAMOND Ts were under going rebuilds at the same time
  11. 2 points
    The EMER for the Gun tank say 810 BHP at 2800 RPM and 1580 FtLbs torque at 2000 RPM. It is interesting that a Meteor has quite a lot of grunt at idling. The Conqueror ARV will neutral steer with the engine idling. The REME museum's Cent ARV has rubber pads on track and so will generally require a touch of throttle to neutral on tarmac. The cylinder heads on the M120 and the Meteorite are very different from a IVB with its more direct Merlin ancestry. As for he exhaust ports, they are different but I have no idea if they are better or not. John
  12. 2 points
    Sye wotherloik, but ee probly duz morn anyuvver geezer to bring in the punterz to see arr clobber an genrilly popyoolaroiz arr obbee . Dunnee? Gits moi vote evree toim. Innit. Muss go; jus seen a genyoowine Waffen SS toasting fork...........ow much?!! Eeemussbeavinalarf!
  13. 2 points
    Ah, parts from Jean Duchamps' emporium for the restoration of ex-French Enfields !
  14. 2 points
    You could try buying this book: http://www.bookworldws.co.uk/9011-tankograd-british-special-recce-p-3346.html others in the series are also good. Not sure why you need camo on your vehicle, with all those shiny bits etc?
  15. 2 points
    Well, it works! We have had some fun and games this morning but eventually, it went and I have some film files to post once I have worked out how to do them.. Idles nicely but dies when I try to open the throttle so I will need some advice about Solex carbs. More later! Steve
  16. 2 points
    My mate Brian built the engine up for me today, everything went well thank goodness. I Passed spanners, parts and mugs of tea 😎 Using the flywheel to turn the crank. Setting the torque wrench for the main caps. Using plasti gauge to check tolerances. Fitting pistons. Old sump used for protection while transporting then re fitting, all new core plugs fitted. Hopefully this should be back in the chassis tomorrow afternoon.
  17. 2 points
    Well, we have had a productive day but, as usual, never quite as fast as we would like! Roy came over again with his big sash clamps and battery drill, both of which proved very useful. We started the day by screwing down the floor boards. This proved hard on the knees but with Roy's clamps to pull them all up, it all went well. When we reached the last plank, they were over-width by 3/16" so I ran a pencil along the last one and then planed it to fit. The challenge was in holding it but we pushed it up against the post of the garage and my big plane soon made short work of it. Mind you, this was helped by the quality of the timber which was beautiful. It is softwood but has a lovely straight grain and no knots. I don't know how Mark gets it. It certainly isn't from B & Q! A test fit and all was well. We removed the kerb rails so that Dad can paint them separately. Once that was done, we turned our attention to the water elbows. Dad drilled the bolt holes in the last one and it was fine, except that it fouled the radiator stay bar so I had to file a bit off the top. Eventually, all was well so all we need now is some hose and we can fit them permanently. That really will be a landmark event. It is back to reality tomorrow, getting ready for work, which is a great pity as I am just getting some momentum going. Oh well. Time to study the job list! Happy New Year everyone! Steve
  18. 2 points
    I finally got around to watching the whole programme on catch-up or iplayer or whatever last night. I think it was phenomenal - regardless of some of the comments on here - because a fairly ordinary bloke uses his celebrity, and the power of TV, to recreate something huge from 100 years ago and get it running with a lot of, widely acknowledged, help. His enthusiasm is infectious and, as he didn't know much about the scale and detail of WWI or H licences, as he learned on screen, he will have enthused others about the subject, engineering, welding, tanks in museums and more. The late Fred Dibnah didn't have the monopoly on being 'a bloke with a regional accent who liked British engineering history' and, as he's dead, the next generation needs a new folk hero. Then, finally, driving the tank at Cambrai, in my opinion, was far more poignant than threading it up a high street. The world is changing and we need to embrace that, in order to see the history that interests us is remembered. I can't wait to see the tank itself somewhere next year. JC
  19. 2 points
    I have explained this a couple of times now, but here goes again. We were forced to move away from our old server because it reached its end of life. The old forum system didn't work on the new server (and was outdated) so we were forced to make a choice: 1) We could either try and fix the problem, which could take forever and would be rather expensive 2) We could move to a new system. When moving to a new system there were two options: 1) Migrate to a new version of the old system, which would be expensive, risky and very time consuming for me and quite frankly, I don't have the time anymore to work on this forum for full days. 2) Migrate to a new system that has a future, is managed (meaning there is a team of tech guys behind it), and where the whole migration is taken care off. And this all would be at a company that we are already working with and have proven to be very reliable. Naturally, we went for option number two; why make life more difficult for us having to manage multiple forum systems? We don't and that is why we chose this. Now I want to close down this whole discussion about that the old system was better. This is it, this is the forum that we are going to use. If you have questions about why it works in a certain way, have a feature request or want to ask if we can change a setting then please do and I will do whatever I can to help out.
  20. 2 points
    Can you please expand to a non-techie , how the previous forum software was about to break ? Was it because it was no longer suitable for hand-held devices ?
  21. 2 points
    Not that birthdays are that important but if the are to be displayed could they be DD/MM/YYYY rather than the US MM/DD/YYYY thanks.
  22. 2 points
    Be careful... Local authorities are pass masters at making unpopular decisions appear to be someone else's doing.... They are full of completely hopeless and useless shysters, charlatans and chancers... devious and sly...
  23. 2 points
    Works best in full screen at 1080p.
  24. 2 points
    To try to make finding the new posts easier, I have made a few screenshots and added some notes. 1. Under the big HMVF logo you should see 'New Posts'. Click on it. 2. This should take you to a page like that shown below. I do not know why it is called 'Unread Content' when the button we clicked was 'New Posts'. We should be able to see all the new posts. But, if the summaries of the posts are huge like shown below, then we can make smaller (see step 3). 3. To save having to scroll and scroll to see all the new posts, look over towards the right-hand side of the screen, just above our list of 'new posts'. There you should find two text buttons: 'Condensed' and 'Expanded'. Click on 'Condensed'. 4. With any luck, you should now have the new posts listed like shown below. OK, it is never going to look as minimalist as the old forum, but then I am never going to look 20 again. 5. Finally, on the picture above I have added another thing for you to click: clicking on that green dot should take you to the first unread post (and not the 'most recent post' as I wrote on the picture). Now, if that still does not make sense, then please ask where you are struggling. trevor
  25. 2 points
    Welcome to our new home! First, let me apologize for the fact that the forum has been down for so long. I never expected that moving 10 years of topics, stories, and pictures to a new location and a new forum system would be so time-consuming. Luckily, we have made it and now we have a new home, it will be mostly the same and different at the same time. There is still work that needs to be done but I'm on it and will do my best to get it all finished as quickly as possible. If you have any questions, please post them here or on this board and I will try and answer / fix them as quickly as possible, Enjoy HMVF!
  26. 2 points
    All I will say is from the stand point of someone who could not run a web site of any shape or form I am immensely thankful for those who can and do....... like most club related actives it can be a thankless task...... so once again well done chaps thank you for your considerable efforts. Pete
  27. 2 points
    The thing is, it was broken and needed fixing. We had no choice.
  28. 2 points
    As Jack says the forum has gone through a number of changes over the years and the initial reaction of most people has been against the change but after a while you forget what the old system was like. There are bound to be hiccups at first but to be fair to Joris he has listened to members comments and reacted where necessary and this at what must have been a very stressful time for him. Thanks Joris. If an old computer illiterate fuddy duddy like me can adapt to the changes I'm sure anyone can.
  29. 2 points
    Really sorry to hear that guys and understand that change is sometimes a pain in the backside. HMVF has been here since 2005 and throughout those years we have naturally have made many changes. This is because the software/tech becomes outdated - so if we don't make the changes then the forum no longer works. Evolution of the forum has always happened and will always happen and sadly there is nothing we can do about that if we want to keep the forum open, alive and up to date. I know it can be very frustrating at the beginning but please hang in there as you will be missed!! My kind regards, Jack.
  30. 1 point
    Having gathered together sufficient parts to make a start over the last year, I am at last ready to commence the restoration of Thornycroft J type No. 2393 of 1915. This chassis was recovered from beneath an old chalet in Skegness and thus protected has survived in remarkably good order. It was discovered and recovered by Graham Hand and passed on to John Marshall, who began to add parts as they became available, but was concentrating on his front runner J type 2282 also of 1915. It is great to find a chassis, particularly one in good condition, but the icing on the cake would be an engine and I became aware of the existence of a collection of Thornycroft parts in Sydney Australia. These parts from various models had been rescued from an auction having failed to attract any bidders and I soon discovered the new owner, Ian Browning was willing to move them on, providing I took on the whole collection. This was more than I wanted, but I decided to go for it and with the blessing of the Australian Government, I made arrangements to export a container load of rusty metal from the other side of the world. Ian took on the job of packing and loading in temperatures of 40 degrees which can't have been pleasant ( Thanks mate !) and after a 3 month voyage I took delivery at Southampton. The haul included 2 chassis (one 'X' one 'J') two M4 engines, one fairly complete, the other less so and various other hard to find parts. The chassis were just post war with no numbers visible. After a hard life hauling loads on Australian roads they were put to work again as farm trailers and further abused until abandoned and rescued for preservation. I had little interest in the rare X type parts,( being a lighter weight export model) and after considerable wrangling managed to swap these and the tired J chassis for the current 1915 project. I now have temporary accommodation which is secure if a little draughty on the Ox/ Bucks border. Anyone with workshop space in this area and/or an interest in helping with this project please shout ! I am also seeking parts including a gearbox, water pump and Diff gear. Regards, Tomo .
  31. 1 point
    Tom you have had some advice over on the WD bike forum and now from Ferg who is a Matchless fan. I can remain fairly un-biased as I have most WD makes and models in my collection. I would say that without a doubt the G3L is the most nippiest, fastest and comfortable bike from the period, but they are lacking in the girder fork experience. To my mind the G3 is one of the prettiest bikes......But neither are my most favourite bikes to work on. From my collection, my most favourite bikes to ride are my WM20 and my Royal Enfield WD/G. Royal Enfield WD/CO's are reasonably available and with a second to none spares back up from Hitchcock's it's an option worth considering. Personally I think you should meet up with guys and their bikes and form your own first hand opinion. But I'm happy to provide pictures of anything you might want to study.
  32. 1 point
    I'll take a look when I get a chance. It's going to be hidden a mess of APs
  33. 1 point
    Light blue touch paper and retire immediately 😉
  34. 1 point
    Images of war: Special forces vehicles: 1940 to the present day.
  35. 1 point
  36. 1 point
    If I remember rightly OC600 was used in Centurion gearboxes, so I guess Hutch 3674 is a young whippersnapper with experience of more modern vehicles. Great work on this old girl, so good luck with it. Steve.
  37. 1 point
    You will find a generic layout of a 15cwt radio body in Volume 2 of the Book Wireless for the Warrior. I would assume that it would identical to the layout in a Bedford which are the most common version. Must be pictures on this site. Also look at the article in Wheels and Tracks on these vehicles which may show a view.
  38. 1 point
    I have managed to do a bit today and have fitted the patch to the sump. It started out as a bit of 20swg copper from the drawer suitably annealed. Then a bit of tapping around using the bossing mallet and a panel beaters hammer, annealing between each go. I annealed it about twelve times altogether. I drilled and tapped the casting for 2BA. The casting is horrible in this area, full of porosity and only 1/8" thick. Then just screwed it down. I shall seal it with modern silicone instant gasket which I think is forgivable in this case but that will have to wait until I get down to Devon again. Wing mirrors next. It never had any but I have tried driving without and it is scary as hell! They will go on the cab frame under the wing nuts. Steve
  39. 1 point
    I was thinking about fitting one, just for the kids, as a treat, so when you turn your back for a second and they are climbing all over it, i could give them the NI experience ?
  40. 1 point
    Thanks Tomo. I'll remember that! We have had a nice day., all bright and still and not cold. I have been pressing on with the hand controls and linkage. First part was to cut the throttle shaft and advance tube to length. Once the tube was to length, I soft soldered the advance lever to one end and the operating lever to the other. The throttle shaft runs up the inside but the tube rattled far too much so I turned up a couple of brass bushes and pressed them in. Trial installation with the levers at the bottom. The actuating collar at the bottom was pinned on and a suitable spring placed between the two collars to keep the actuating levers in contact with the quadrant. Then the hand throttle linkage was made up along with the advance linkage. I still need to connect the pedal and add a return spring. It was all surprisingly time consuming. In the mean time, Father has put two more coats of paint on the wings and Tim has been filling stauffers, a very messy job. Foot throttle, wiring and timing tomorrow and then it is the moment of truth! Steve.
  41. 1 point
    Track return rollers shafts manufactured and bolted in place. Jon
  42. 1 point
    Must be pretty rare 6 stud split rim trailer wheel https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/WW2-military-split-rim-wheel-6-stud-airborne-jeep-champ-6-50-X-16-Goodyear-Tyre/232638175504?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2055119.m1438.l2649
  43. 1 point
    Chris Wilkinson told me that if he ever had purchaced any Covenantor parts and particularly Meadows flat 12 parts, that he would scrap them as soon as he identified them. There was no market whatsoever for them, military or civilian, so there was no point keeping them. Presumably that would have been a common attitude among the dealers at the time. It might well be that some Meadows flat 12s survived longer than the Covenantors because the Covenantor power train was used in the British copy of the LVT4, known as the Neptune. These were not exactly successful but did stay in service long enough for the last remaining ones to be driven into breaches in the sea defences in the Fens in the 1950's floods, and deliberatly sunk as a barrier. As far as I know they are still there. There was a smaller version of the Meadows flat 12, of 165hp vs 280hp, used in the Tetrarch light tank. This engine was also intended to be used in the FV420 series carriers, which would have given a flat load floor like a Stalwart, but a policy decission was made to use the RR B80 resulting in a big bump in the middle of the load bay which was not exactly helpful and resulted in a complete re design into the FV430 series where the (B81) engine moved into the front LH corner of the hull.
  44. 1 point
    You will probably need only need to change the base plate - if that. Have a chat with these fine folks: http://www.distributordoctor.com/
  45. 1 point
    I got my DAF about a month ago and I'm really chuffed with it, its in good condition with everything working apart from: The horn - Turned out to be a corroded spade on the horn itself. Cab tilt alarm sounded as soon as I went off-road - Had to adjust the lockdown switch position. Diff lock light not illuminating - Blown dash bulb. There is some rust in the side rails by the rear mudflaps but it's an easy repair. The speedo works but not the odometer, its weird as it looks like it's missing, it should be a small LCD display in the main speedo but looking closely in the window where it should be you can see the back pcb of the speedo. I could also do with a new top canvas. It's fun driving it off road, its already pulled my van out when I got it stuck on my track in the mud. Overall height of mine is 11' 6" according to the cab display, that's with frame and canvas.
  46. 1 point
    I wasn't very happy on day one with the new forum but I have found that with use my feelings towards it are improving. If you give the new forum a go, hopefully as you become more familiar with the forum, it will become easier and therefore enjoyable to use.
  47. 1 point
    Hi Joris , many thanks for explaining the reason why , I like many others struggle with IT change , and I can liken the use of the old format to driving your old MV in the dark where you know where all the controls are ! The new format is similar to jumping in an unfamiliar vehicle equally in the dark , where I can't quite find where the lights or indicators are ! five miles up the road all will be fine , and the same will be for the new forum layout. Thank you and your team for all the effort needed to make the transition.
  48. 1 point
    Thanks Might be useful to have a how to do section
  49. 1 point
    Hi Joris, Good work, I expect Jack held you back otherwise you would have had it finished earlier. Will take a bit of time to navigate the new layout though. cheers Richard
  50. 1 point
    The "whereabouts of said info" is the spare desk next to mine at work more seriously, the illustrations came from Air Publication 4995A "Douglas Heavy Aircraft Tractor, Mk.3". We can get it copied but it might cost a bit, alternatively your friend can arrange to come to the RAF Museum and photograph the lot himself for £7.20 (plus travel costs!).
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