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Showing content with the highest reputation since 02/13/2012 in Posts

  1. 7 points
    A Genie! Gosh that made me laugh. Nothing quite so exciting really. Here is a picture of the store room.
  2. 4 points
    Sorry, I was not responding to any implied criticism, just my frustration at Photobucket black mailing me. I have just updated page one of the Thornycroft and nearly finished the Peerless thread. There are about a further 4,650 photos for me to replace, so I better get back to it then. Interestingly, these threads still attract a great deal of interest and it would be a shame to loose it all. Very sadly, a great deal of other threads and photos will have been lost. Anyway, normal services will be resumed as soon as possible. .
  3. 3 points
    I'm not taking any chances, being an auto electrician I have self insulated. Joking aside I have come out of retirement to drive artics for a supermarket company. We are gradually getting back to normal as suppliers have in many cases ramped production up by 50% and we are working round the clock but there are still plenty of retards abusing the system by stockpiling perishable food which will have rotted long before it gets used.
  4. 3 points
    Hi Ian, They look great, I like the toothed ring for the ABS sensor on the wheel in the middle of the picture 😁. David
  5. 3 points
    Take a look here: https://digitalcommons.unl.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1727&context=tsaconf Dunlop. Neoprene rubber substitute. 'Camouflarge cloth' ....secret. Air Ministry Ballon Section built them, so did Shepperton Studios. Search Google widely and deeply and ye shall reap 'facts'. My interest is Force R, who whilst they were the masters of deception in WW2, were at some point brought back into play for the Cold War ...... certainly in Tripolitania in 1955 and as an overtly Royal Engineer unit were based in at least one regiment's base at one time (Homs, 3RHA) to utilise a new unusualy large purpose built aircraft-type hanger ....on the edge of the parade square to house what is anyone's guess as I can't track much in the archives remotely from the lands unfit for human habitation. I was alerted to Force R by a Veteran of 3RHA who was there and he told me that the unit was based in their camp and that personnel of Force R were not allowed to mix with the troops stationed in Homs as 'their work was secret'. They dressed in quasi-military uniforms and were 'scruffy'! What I have found out officially is that Force R were indeed in Libya to build dummy V Force bomber diversionary airfields in the desert .... as the real RAF Idris was a known diversionary real airfield for when the 'balloon went up'. The thinking is the large hanger was for constructing/inflating dummy aircraft ... the hanger, even I can remember as a child there in 1959-61 was huge and most certainly was big enough to house a blow-up Vulcan or two! Whether there ever were inflatable British jet aircraft at that time, or after I know not. The hanger was not used for anything after 1957 when 3RHA departed, seemingly 'empty' during 6 and 2RTR's time in situ though no other Veteran could tell me what the hanger was used for even if they could remember it being there. So if you know anything about dummy airfields, inflatable aircraft and Cold War deception in Libya, do please sing out.
  6. 3 points
    Yes it sure has! and I think I can Now Confirm that we are all agreed that we like and dislike Guy Martin, Like and Dislike the replica Tank, think that machines and systems are safer in the old days before health and safety and are safer today, we need more and less people in engineering and are pro and anti Europe, want to get rid of people who use their money to push technology forward and also want to keep them. I'm Glad that's all now settled, better close this thread off before it gets out of hand!
  7. 3 points
    Speaking as a forum Admin and IT support guy I can tell you that it is a hugely thankless task keeping these things running. More often than not the Admins are well aware of issues that the end-user is not aware us and in some cases it's a case of holding on and hoping it doesn't go bang before you can get to fix it properly, (surely anyone who has ever had to jury-rig an engine just to get home will sympathise with that). The problem with forums is if they go bang, getting them back is easy (just a quick case of re-installing everything from scratch), getting all the data back is the hard bit. Reaching for your regular back-ups only to find that they too are corrupt is something every IT support Engineer dreads...it is what keeps us up a t night! Sometimes upgrading the software is something that is forced upon us by the forward march of progress. Recently my own forum stopped working and whenever a user posted something all that appeared was an empty post. It soon became obvious that, overnight, the company hosting the forum had upgraded the underlying database software (MySQL) and another essential web component (PHP) to the very latest versions, (they do these upgrades for security reasons, to keep out hackers and those who would embed viruses). Sadly, our Forum software does not work with these new upgrades and so we are being forced to upgrade before we were ready to do so. We now have to make a decision if we stay with the forum software we are using, which was what was being used here before the upgrade, or go another route to keep with the times and to give folks the feature requests they want. I don't know about here but I keep getting asked if I can add 'LIKE' buttons to threads. I can't and the software doesn't allow for it but the newest version does; it's just a case of whether I'm prepared to pay for that or not, especially when paying for the hosting costs is already a burden. Nobody likes change, (all of us here are here precisely because we like the old ways) but sometimes change is forced upon us, for whatever reason, and we just have to learn to deal with it. I appreciate that it gets harder as one gets older (I'm in my mid 50's now and beginning to get very set in my ways) but it is what it is and we need to learn to adjust. You just need to remember that we all come here for the content, the camaraderie and shared enthusiasm for all things historic, military and vehicular... the manner, or format, in which it is presented is less important. Just my two pfennigs!
  8. 2 points
    This is the curse of restoration when "flying" somewhat blind. i.e., without good source-drawings or photos to study. I found when I did my TE, I did many things twice. And there was no common-cause. Sometimes poor machining on my part, or the job did not look right; or, as we discovered later, it was to foul some as-not-yet-thought-about part. My solution, as with all conundrums of this type, lies with Doctor Shepherd & Dr Neame's patent problem-solving elixir - to wit, Masterbrew.
  9. 2 points
    I'm convinced that a trip to 'the stores' actually involves rubbing a lamp to summon a genie with access to a seemingly inexhaustible supply of obscure 100+ year old lorry parts... 😂
  10. 2 points
    Evening All, I thought that I would do a pre-Christmas update. I have been concentrating on the wiring, a bit odd you may think as there are more pressing jobs with the drive etc but I needed something that wasn't complicated and that I could dip in and out of. I am glad that I did, as there were a lot of holes to drill, clips to make and trunking to run and head scratching to do. There is a section of flexible trunking that runs in front of the driver, around the peddle area. I had thought that it was part of the wiring but I am now not so sure, as I have identified the wiring route and it doesn't use that section of trunking. However I have used it to run the gearbox kickdown switch wiring in, as it runs in the adjacent area. The wiring is now complete and tested but I have made use of a lot more flexible trunking than the original. All the wires in the original appear to be black, I have used colour coded wires but where they can be seen I have jointed onto black extensions. I have left the wires long enough so that they can be pulled out of the end of the trunking so that the various colours can be identified as they join the black ends. The interior of the hull contains light sockets for the magnetic work light as well as adjustable station lights. So far, I have been able to identify the location of two sockets, one by the driver and one in the turret and two station lights, one in the turret and one by the radio operators position. I would have expected to find three of each so I will keep on looking. Work light location next to the driver I posted a question on another forum with refence to the station lights and amazingly one of the various styles is still produced, but for an automotive application. I had to make the work light sockets. The sockets are standard DIN sockets pressed into the housing but the spade connections had to be altered. In situ with the work light plugged in.
  11. 2 points
    I recently had some time to spare at work, so I thought I'd run AP2515A Vol.III, Mechanical Transport Vehicles Complete, dated May 1946 through the scanner. It essentially lists all of the MT vehicles, trailers and associated bodies, in use with the RAF at the time. Interestingly, some of the chassis/complete vehicles have the contract numbers listed and for many of those the chassis number ranges covered by each contract are included. Also included at the end is the first amendment list, from January 1947. If it's of interest, we also have the second edition of May '52 and the fifth edition from April '64 Apologies if there is a better place to put this. AP2515A 1946.pdf
  12. 2 points
    I replied to a earlier thread on this subject and at that time could not add any thing to it other than what i knew at that time since then l have been put to gether a list of RAF MU's AAW's AVD BVD RVD and there locations several things have come to light concerning the numbers allocated to them one location can have two or three different numbers on the same site or in a area covered by one area command BURN near YORK and BARLOW near SELBY had the same 41 AVD were is this taking us well up to now with what i already knew i have found one hundred locations and B42 was located at WALLINGTON in the uk ps at the same time DIAMOND Ts were under going rebuilds at the same time
  13. 2 points
    The EMER for the Gun tank say 810 BHP at 2800 RPM and 1580 FtLbs torque at 2000 RPM. It is interesting that a Meteor has quite a lot of grunt at idling. The Conqueror ARV will neutral steer with the engine idling. The REME museum's Cent ARV has rubber pads on track and so will generally require a touch of throttle to neutral on tarmac. The cylinder heads on the M120 and the Meteorite are very different from a IVB with its more direct Merlin ancestry. As for he exhaust ports, they are different but I have no idea if they are better or not. John
  14. 2 points
    Sye wotherloik, but ee probly duz morn anyuvver geezer to bring in the punterz to see arr clobber an genrilly popyoolaroiz arr obbee . Dunnee? Gits moi vote evree toim. Innit. Muss go; jus seen a genyoowine Waffen SS toasting fork...........ow much?!! Eeemussbeavinalarf!
  15. 2 points
    Ah, parts from Jean Duchamps' emporium for the restoration of ex-French Enfields !
  16. 2 points
    You could try buying this book: http://www.bookworldws.co.uk/9011-tankograd-british-special-recce-p-3346.html others in the series are also good. Not sure why you need camo on your vehicle, with all those shiny bits etc?
  17. 2 points
    Well, it works! We have had some fun and games this morning but eventually, it went and I have some film files to post once I have worked out how to do them.. Idles nicely but dies when I try to open the throttle so I will need some advice about Solex carbs. More later! Steve
  18. 2 points
    My mate Brian built the engine up for me today, everything went well thank goodness. I Passed spanners, parts and mugs of tea 😎 Using the flywheel to turn the crank. Setting the torque wrench for the main caps. Using plasti gauge to check tolerances. Fitting pistons. Old sump used for protection while transporting then re fitting, all new core plugs fitted. Hopefully this should be back in the chassis tomorrow afternoon.
  19. 2 points
    Hi guys, Finding a cheap deac Gimpy is the holy grail. It's like trying to find a nice deac SA80. I am sorry I have not responded to the questions in this string, I don't use HMVF anymore, although I have an account. Thanks to @MatchFuzee for dropping me a message to let me know about this discussion. As the events and safety officer of the MVT I can answer some of your MVT insurance queries. We have had a radical change in the insurance for our members. It does mean that all of our members now have £5M public liability insurance when putting on a military display to the public. All that is required to get this is a valid membership card and some id to prove you are that person. Like all insurance packages there are a few things that aren't covered, these are as follows - Stallholding and selling of military items - Battle re-enactment, in terms of firing blank weapons and running through an arena in a mock battle. You are covered for all static and walking re-enactments. - The purchase of weapons, the MVT used to provide this cover for people to buy weapons, but with the growth of BB guns we were experiencing a huge rise in people joining for one year just to buy a weapon. Since we are a vehicle club and not a gun club we decided that this was not in the interests of the charitable aims of the club. Now you may say but that is extra income, however it brought with it a lot of issues, people buying BB guns for the wrong reasons, shopkeepers regularly calling us for clarification and unwanted interest with the authorities. So in short, you cannot use your MVT card to buy weapons, but you can use it to prove you have Public liability insurance when you are re-enacting. The MVT are not anti-gun however at the end of the day we are a vehicle club. I hope this answers your questions. I am unlikely to look at this string again unless anyone else flags it up to me, so if you have any further queries I would be happy to answer them directly on e-mail - safety@mvt.org.uk. Tim Hawkes
  20. 2 points
    Well, we have had a productive day but, as usual, never quite as fast as we would like! Roy came over again with his big sash clamps and battery drill, both of which proved very useful. We started the day by screwing down the floor boards. This proved hard on the knees but with Roy's clamps to pull them all up, it all went well. When we reached the last plank, they were over-width by 3/16" so I ran a pencil along the last one and then planed it to fit. The challenge was in holding it but we pushed it up against the post of the garage and my big plane soon made short work of it. Mind you, this was helped by the quality of the timber which was beautiful. It is softwood but has a lovely straight grain and no knots. I don't know how Mark gets it. It certainly isn't from B & Q! A test fit and all was well. We removed the kerb rails so that Dad can paint them separately. Once that was done, we turned our attention to the water elbows. Dad drilled the bolt holes in the last one and it was fine, except that it fouled the radiator stay bar so I had to file a bit off the top. Eventually, all was well so all we need now is some hose and we can fit them permanently. That really will be a landmark event. It is back to reality tomorrow, getting ready for work, which is a great pity as I am just getting some momentum going. Oh well. Time to study the job list! Happy New Year everyone! Steve
  21. 2 points
    I finally got around to watching the whole programme on catch-up or iplayer or whatever last night. I think it was phenomenal - regardless of some of the comments on here - because a fairly ordinary bloke uses his celebrity, and the power of TV, to recreate something huge from 100 years ago and get it running with a lot of, widely acknowledged, help. His enthusiasm is infectious and, as he didn't know much about the scale and detail of WWI or H licences, as he learned on screen, he will have enthused others about the subject, engineering, welding, tanks in museums and more. The late Fred Dibnah didn't have the monopoly on being 'a bloke with a regional accent who liked British engineering history' and, as he's dead, the next generation needs a new folk hero. Then, finally, driving the tank at Cambrai, in my opinion, was far more poignant than threading it up a high street. The world is changing and we need to embrace that, in order to see the history that interests us is remembered. I can't wait to see the tank itself somewhere next year. JC
  22. 2 points
    I have explained this a couple of times now, but here goes again. We were forced to move away from our old server because it reached its end of life. The old forum system didn't work on the new server (and was outdated) so we were forced to make a choice: 1) We could either try and fix the problem, which could take forever and would be rather expensive 2) We could move to a new system. When moving to a new system there were two options: 1) Migrate to a new version of the old system, which would be expensive, risky and very time consuming for me and quite frankly, I don't have the time anymore to work on this forum for full days. 2) Migrate to a new system that has a future, is managed (meaning there is a team of tech guys behind it), and where the whole migration is taken care off. And this all would be at a company that we are already working with and have proven to be very reliable. Naturally, we went for option number two; why make life more difficult for us having to manage multiple forum systems? We don't and that is why we chose this. Now I want to close down this whole discussion about that the old system was better. This is it, this is the forum that we are going to use. If you have questions about why it works in a certain way, have a feature request or want to ask if we can change a setting then please do and I will do whatever I can to help out.
  23. 2 points
    Can you please expand to a non-techie , how the previous forum software was about to break ? Was it because it was no longer suitable for hand-held devices ?
  24. 2 points
    Not that birthdays are that important but if the are to be displayed could they be DD/MM/YYYY rather than the US MM/DD/YYYY thanks.
  25. 2 points
    Be careful... Local authorities are pass masters at making unpopular decisions appear to be someone else's doing.... They are full of completely hopeless and useless shysters, charlatans and chancers... devious and sly...
  26. 2 points
    Works best in full screen at 1080p.
  27. 2 points
    To try to make finding the new posts easier, I have made a few screenshots and added some notes. 1. Under the big HMVF logo you should see 'New Posts'. Click on it. 2. This should take you to a page like that shown below. I do not know why it is called 'Unread Content' when the button we clicked was 'New Posts'. We should be able to see all the new posts. But, if the summaries of the posts are huge like shown below, then we can make smaller (see step 3). 3. To save having to scroll and scroll to see all the new posts, look over towards the right-hand side of the screen, just above our list of 'new posts'. There you should find two text buttons: 'Condensed' and 'Expanded'. Click on 'Condensed'. 4. With any luck, you should now have the new posts listed like shown below. OK, it is never going to look as minimalist as the old forum, but then I am never going to look 20 again. 5. Finally, on the picture above I have added another thing for you to click: clicking on that green dot should take you to the first unread post (and not the 'most recent post' as I wrote on the picture). Now, if that still does not make sense, then please ask where you are struggling. trevor
  28. 2 points
    Welcome to our new home! First, let me apologize for the fact that the forum has been down for so long. I never expected that moving 10 years of topics, stories, and pictures to a new location and a new forum system would be so time-consuming. Luckily, we have made it and now we have a new home, it will be mostly the same and different at the same time. There is still work that needs to be done but I'm on it and will do my best to get it all finished as quickly as possible. If you have any questions, please post them here or on this board and I will try and answer / fix them as quickly as possible, Enjoy HMVF!
  29. 2 points
    All I will say is from the stand point of someone who could not run a web site of any shape or form I am immensely thankful for those who can and do....... like most club related actives it can be a thankless task...... so once again well done chaps thank you for your considerable efforts. Pete
  30. 2 points
    The thing is, it was broken and needed fixing. We had no choice.
  31. 2 points
    As Jack says the forum has gone through a number of changes over the years and the initial reaction of most people has been against the change but after a while you forget what the old system was like. There are bound to be hiccups at first but to be fair to Joris he has listened to members comments and reacted where necessary and this at what must have been a very stressful time for him. Thanks Joris. If an old computer illiterate fuddy duddy like me can adapt to the changes I'm sure anyone can.
  32. 2 points
    Really sorry to hear that guys and understand that change is sometimes a pain in the backside. HMVF has been here since 2005 and throughout those years we have naturally have made many changes. This is because the software/tech becomes outdated - so if we don't make the changes then the forum no longer works. Evolution of the forum has always happened and will always happen and sadly there is nothing we can do about that if we want to keep the forum open, alive and up to date. I know it can be very frustrating at the beginning but please hang in there as you will be missed!! My kind regards, Jack.
  33. 1 point
    Yes, looking at other photos I have it looks like most trucks of the Central Powers were also right hand drive. US built ones were also right hand drive but started swapping over in the late teens early 20's. .
  34. 1 point
    Changing from Fwd to Rev and visa Versa on the transfer box was always hit and miss on CVR(T). Try engaging it while stopping the engine. I.e. with the engine running move from fwd to rev or other way around and while pulling or pushing the lever switch off the ignition at the same time. You should feel the lever move fully into the engaged position. That was the drill we used to have the drivers do if they had the same problem.
  35. 1 point
    Early 1944 Ariel WNG 350 cc.Carefully restored to current condition, using genuine and NOS parts, over a period of many months.Starts and rides well - ideal for D Day.Some spare parts included.Offers around £7000
  36. 1 point
    Very nice kit Ian. Pitty that not affordable for me. Shall you have any other leftovers like the hose-pans or genuine taps, I might be interested. Cheers, Dusan
  37. 1 point
    An "Airman of the day" using them:- https://www.bbc.co.uk/history/ww2peopleswar/stories/99/a2909199.shtml The Gooseneck Flare was so called because of the long-necked spout on the container that resembled a large watering can. The main body contained paraffin, or other flammable liquid with a wick travelling up the spout and extending by a small amount. The Gooseneck Flare would be positioned with the spout pointing downwind to prevent flaring when it was alight. It produced a bright light that was extremely difficult to extinguish in the event of enemy aircraft approaching the airfield. The Gooseneck Flares were positioned at intervals along both edges of the runway being used at night to assist the pilots in taking off and landing their aeroplane. On the end of the spout there was a metal hinged flap that could be used to cover the wick to extinguish the flame when no longer requird. When not in use the Gooseneck Flare would be stored in the Night Flying Equipment Building. Copied from:- https://www.rafharrowbeer-dartmoor.org.uk/fp.php?id=1173
  38. 1 point
    During our holiday we spent a day in Winchester looking through the Thornycroft records (the glamorous assistant is very good to me). I thought this table of valve settings might help a few people out so have included it here. Here is a general arrangement drawing of the T4 engine I need for this project (just in case somebody has one under their bench and does not know what it is). And another drawing showing the magneto cabling arrangements. The switch was mounted in the centre of the dash, just below the oil flow indicator (has anyone got a photo showing the detail of these?). There were also drawings of all the gaskets and various other minor parts but we did not find any drawings of the more major components (pistons, cylinders, crank, crankcase etc.)
  39. 1 point
    Simms SRM4 direction reversal Remove points cover and distributor cap Undo screw in middle of cam Make a small puller and remove cam ,note the letter stamp on the cam to indicate rotation direction Remove backing plate behind points Find the dot on the small gear which should line up with either the L or R mark om the distributor gear and set appropriately Replace cam in correct position remark direction on mag body so you dont forget that the arrow on the oil cap is now in the wrong direction
  40. 1 point
    Yes, thanks again for your help. I had asked many 'knowledgeable' people about the problem over the last two years to no avail. I posted the original question more as a last resort. I hope our paths cross one day. Jeff
  41. 1 point
    Pretty sure that no 9 are the four bars that hold the four wooden 100-125 Ah battery boxes into their frames. If the Morris mirrors MWR practice, there should be four frames with eight long threaded rods to which are welded large wing nuts. These screw down onto those bars to hold the batteries in place.
  42. 1 point
    Found this in the Guy FBAX manual, hope the tips can help you with your magneto David
  43. 1 point
    That depends... it could have spinner hubcaps 🤣
  44. 1 point
    I've been trying PULSETECH XTREME chargers (well the MOD apparently use them), thinking it might be a solution to my dilemma of a shed full of OPTIMA batteries hanging around for months before being called upon to earn their keep. I know Antar on here has had very good results with them on Hawker batteries. I also know some of my batteries are sulphated - but unless badly sulphated they should still take a reasonable charge even if they don't last as long. I've had some batteries on charge for over 3 months continuous and the red lights flickr about and indicate 'duff battery'. When tried they are dead. So it is a bit annoying to then put the same batteries onto a more modest OPTIMATE 4, only to have most of them charge up to decent cranking power. Some of them do not last as long as a tip top battery might, but quite adequate none the less. I've then put the same battery back onto the PULSETECH only to find it won't charge - straight back to the annoying row of flashing red lights. To my mind the PULSETECH would display more intelligence if it had an indicator on it which said "Well mate, your battery is f*&@%d, but I've put as much in as it will take so at least you're out of trouble, but don't blame me if it fails somewhere down the road". Just to sit there smugly flashing your tiny red LEDs saying "Look - I'm not going to charge any old sh&t batteries OK? Don't bother me until you've bought a new battery" displays a degree of arrogance and an attitude which quite frankly is not helpful in the slightest. I feel so much better having offloaded that - I think I'll cancel today's appointment with my Analyst.
  45. 1 point
    Similar Dutch Army water bowser, dated 1980, on Ebay, has different drawbar, this type of trailer not really of much interest to collectors, compared to a cargo trailer its only use is carrying water https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Water-Bowser-Military-Trailer/273044621224?hash=item3f92ba47a8:g:djUAAOSwD39abaQe
  46. 1 point
    Thanks but its nothing, just flour, sugar, butter, eggs and lots of cream, jam and chocolate. Jon
  47. 1 point
    Hi All, I saw this recent recovery of a Soviet armoured patrol boat from the Volga, and thought it might be of interest here too. best Regards, Prof http://www.thefirearmblog.com/blog/2017/12/11/soviet-armored-ww2-patrol-boat-bk-31-recovered-stalingrad/
  48. 1 point
    An old trick which I have used very successfully is to remove the spark plug and thread a foot or so of soft rope through the hole. Then turn the engine gently so that the piston pushes the rope against the valve and stops it dropping. When you have done, turn the engine the other way and pull the rope out. This works brilliantly on lesser engines but would get a bit tedious on a Meteor ! Obviously it doesn't work on the exhaust valves of early landrovers or B series engines or any side valve engines. I have also used it to lock the crank on lawnmower and chainsaw engines when undoing the flywheel nut but you need to use enough rope that it goes solid at roughly mid stroke to get the best leverage. David
  49. 1 point
    The new format is fine for those who like change - upgrades and inprovment's !!! can be made without losing the old and comfortable
  50. 1 point
    So anyone else down here on zero with me? (or is it goodnight from me and goodnight from me again!!!) :rofl: Gerry
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