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Thread: No. 194

  1. #41
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    Default Re: No. 194

    Could come from Kaki- Which I belive is from the Cape Dutch. God the weird things you pick up studying military history,
    Leading the charge!
    Jeeps posed for pictures Dodges were to busy working. I'm not mad! My voices say I'm sane! And I am not in the pay of Jersey tourisim No longer a 101. Now a Dodge WC54. If there is one thing makes me angry, its all the Incredible Hulk Films!! (Tony Banner)

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  3. #42

    Default Re: No. 194

    Variations on 'kaka' turn up in all Indo-European languages, usually as baby talk, though it is used by adult Boers, also in Welsh (as cac, caca, cachi) and Scots ( pronounced 'keekh'). (Oddly enough, we Welsh also share the other Afrikaans word for faeces; I think they spell it 'poep', whereas we have 'pwp'). In Hindi and Farsi, 'Khaki' means dust or dirt, and in Greek 'Kakos' just means bad. It goes right back to the Neolithic, a word with the weight of centuries. Just think of that when you next... All right; I'll just apologise and depart...



    Sorry Clive; this is getting a bit linguistic and unsavoury - but, in my defence, what can you expect to find in a latrine?

  4. #43
    Join Date
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    Default Re: No. 194

    Quote Originally Posted by Shamouti Ben Yafo View Post
    Variations on 'kaka' turn up in all Indo-European languages, usually as baby talk, though it is used by adult Boers, also in Welsh (as cac, caca, cachi) and Scots ( pronounced 'keekh'). (Oddly enough, we Welsh also share the other Afrikaans word for faeces; I think they spell it 'poep', whereas we have 'pwp'). In Hindi and Farsi, 'Khaki' means dust or dirt, and in Greek 'Kakos' just means bad. It goes right back to the Neolithic, a word with the weight of centuries. Just think of that when you next... All right; I'll just apologise and depart...



    Sorry Clive; this is getting a bit linguistic and unsavoury - but, in my defence, what can you expect to find in a latrine?
    Very funny - enjoyed that!

  5. #44
    Join Date
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    1,550

    Default Re: No. 194

    Quote Originally Posted by Shamouti Ben Yafo View Post
    BTW, on a tangent, does anyone know the origin of 'khazi' or 'Kharzi'? I have heard that it's from Hindi, but no one I've met (all natives) know anything like it in Hindi, Urdu or Panjabi; another theory is that it comes from isiZuli 'imKhazi', but it doesn't ring a bell with the Zulu, Xhosa or Djebele I've asked.
    The OED and Collins both have it a deriving from a Cockney word generally given as 'Carsey' for little house, itself said to have derived from the Italian Casa (for house). Suspect it's one of those lost in the mists of time, though.

  6. #45
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    Default Re: No. 194

    In Jerriais, we sort of mix, the Polite term is L' P'tite Maison (The little house, more colioquoly Le Chiotte.
    Leading the charge!
    Jeeps posed for pictures Dodges were to busy working. I'm not mad! My voices say I'm sane! And I am not in the pay of Jersey tourisim No longer a 101. Now a Dodge WC54. If there is one thing makes me angry, its all the Incredible Hulk Films!! (Tony Banner)

  7. #46

    Default Re: No. 194

    Ooh! Jeriais! So good to see that posted. My wife (qualified technical translator) was as glad to see that as was I.

    In Welsh we use 'Ty bach', which also means little house - as outdoor ones were, and brick or even stone built at that. 'Toiled' (with the /e/ pronounced) is modern. There again, 'lavatory' is a fairly recent back-formation to differentiate from 'latrine', from the Classical Latin 'latrina'; in Old Latin this was 'lavatrina' - from 'lavare', to wash.


    Feeling a bit flushed here... Sorry Clive; disgraced myself again.

  8. #47
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    Default Re: No. 194

    No problem. The after-quiz banter usually descends into this. Uncannily the mystery objects over the years regularly feature these facilities of their various kinds. It plays on the fascination with man's ingenuity in coping with this age old problem that is especially challenging in the battlefield.
    Clive Elliott

    Always wanted old British Army publications of any period (the older the better) eg AC, ACI, AEMI, AESP, AO, COSA, CP, CR, DCI, EMEC, EMEI, EMER, EMPL, EMPS, ER, ETS, JSP, LoC, LTI, MAOS, MRA, RAOS, REA, VAOS, WMTI, etc, Army & WO Coded publications in paper or fiche.

  9. #48
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    Default Re: No. 194

    to expand on names used for these places of short residence, the Aussies call them the 'dunny' ........ probably because when you come out, you have usually 'dun it' ....... unless you have a problem of course

    Why do we always end up on this subject .....I blame Clive, he reads too many old books .....
    Richard Farrant

    1943 Bedford QLD - 1941 BSA WM20 - 1943 Daimler Scout Car Mk.2
    MVT no. 1087 - IMPS no. 57 - AMVCS hon. member and Comms. officer
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