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Thread: It's here! (Bedford RL)

  1. #111
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    Dec 2015
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    146

    Default Re: It's here! (Bedford RL)

    Water-pump's back together again! Surprisingly, it didn't gush water out of it as fast as I poured it in. In fact, it seems to be holding water very well, a couple of loose hose-clamps aside.

    (Already had some slight complaints about my burble being somewhat incomprehensible, I'll add captioning at some point. Probably after work tomorrow.)

    So, I decided to trundle it on over to the machine-shop that re-made the flange I broke.



    Getting it back over and parked up was an exercise in frustration; which (un)fortunately, I didn't manage to capture because I forgot to turn the camera back on. It took me about as long to shuffle the truck sideways in shallow S turns, as it did to drive to the machine-shop. Combined with a very VERY warm cab -- no engine cover fitted, it's next to my work-bench, awaiting rust-treatment -- it was a trying experience.



    Not prodded and poked at the brake servo since my last post, since I was out all 'weekend' (the Weds/Thurs); I'll have another look at it and see if I can figure out what bits I'm missing.
    I think I'm actually missing the plunger of the assist valve completely, though; so that'll be interesting to deal with.

    One of my next steps may well be to get the fuel tank cleaned and painted, ready to go back on. Not convinced that the level sender is working as it should; doesn't appear to be a smooth resistance curve from full to empty... jumps around a lot, going open-circuit at a couple of spots up the rheostat. May just be corrosion/deposits that might clean off.

    Long shot: Does anyone have a rough idea of what resistance I should be seeing between the sender output, and its earth, at the limits of its travel? (The WSM doesn't seem to list it, unless I've missed it.) If not, I'll just have to figure out what it should be, by the "lots of error" method.

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  3. #112
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
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    67

    Default Re: It's here! (Bedford RL)

    Quote Originally Posted by Tamber View Post
    Long shot: Does anyone have a rough idea of what resistance I should be seeing between the sender output, and its earth, at the limits of its travel? (The WSM doesn't seem to list it, unless I've missed it.) If not, I'll just have to figure out what it should be, by the "lots of error" method.
    To find what the values are you could attach a variable resistance (Volume pot from some bit of scrap electronics) across the sender wires and twiddle it to see the guage move. When the needle lines up with Empty or Full measure the resistance with your multimeter.

    I measured the sender from a Cortina some time ago and the values are:
    Empty 80 Ohms
    Full 10 Ohms

    Good Luck

  4. #113
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
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    146

    Default Re: It's here! (Bedford RL)

    Quote Originally Posted by pc1959 View Post
    To find what the values are you could attach a variable resistance (Volume pot from some bit of scrap electronics) across the sender wires and twiddle it to see the guage move.
    Yeah, that's the "lots of error" method; I was just hoping that maybe someone had a mental note stashed away somewhere. If not, then I'll figure it out, then make note of it here; who knows, maybe it'll help someone in the future.

    A Wild Update Appears

    Some tin-abuse and welding was done. Not the prettiest, by far; but it is what it is.



    And the "stand back and squint" version:


    And the "in painful, hideous detail; warts and all" version:


    It's still only welded on the outside, at the moment; I need to do a little more work on the inside of the door to provide some solid structure to affix it to, before I worry about making it pretty. I also need to fix up the hole where the mirror support was ripped out, and mount the mirror arm again.

    Having mirrors would be nice. It's ... interesting, trying to park up against a fence, with cars parked behind you... when you can only just about see backwards through the window in the back of the cab. No major events have occurred yet, though.

    The replacement fuse-box was carried on a bit further, too; though I managed to blow some of the labels off with the air-gun while I was blowing all the grinding dust out.


    Looks relatively neat on the top, but the underside is an abomination unto Nuggan:


    This is mostly because the plan evolved as I was making it. If I were to do another, I'd start off by putting the bus-bars on the underside, and make slots underneath the relays/fuse holders rather than just single holes.
    A large-ish change in the plan was to build it into an enclosure; which is what I should've done from the start, but hey ho. If I knew what I was doing, it wouldn't be nearly as fun.

    Using the enclosure gives me a nice enough option for mounting the plugs, though; drill one rectangular hole in the side of the box, and stuff the plug through it.


    Make a tab, shaped like so:


    And then the connector can be retained, thusly:


    Finally, bung a screw through the whole lot (with a nut on the back) just to ensure the tab doesn't work loose.


    The astute amongst you may notice that there are two connectors in the box, now... One (labelled "Power") is the outputs from the relays and fuses to the various lights; the other (labelled "Switches"), runs to the instrument panel, etc.

    Using those plugs, I aim to get the fuse/relay box completed entirely outside of the truck; rather than fitting it to the back wall of the cab -- behind the passenger's seat, as there's enough room there, just -- and then having to try terminate all those wires in a neat manner while folded into unpleasant shapes.

    There will still be plenty of contortionism required, but this should reduce the amount of it required, with any luck; and the connectors will just plug right on... I'll just have to run the large fused power, and a matching ground, cable into the box via some glands.



    I do like these connectors; and they're pretty well-proven in an automotive environment, too. DAF use variants of them pretty heavily down the chassis of their trucks. (It should be noted, I've not bothered with the little rubber sealing bungs and whatnot in my plug; because I don't expect the environment to be invading that high up into the truck interior. Worst case, I plug the back of the, er, plug with silicon. )

  5. #114
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
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    146

    Default Re: It's here! (Bedford RL)

    I've managed to clean up the rheostat on the level sender such that it's reading fairly smoothly now, and I have some values! It's pretty linear, ranging at 0 ohms with the tank empty to 40 ohms with tank full.

    In other news…

    A fuse-box has found itself attached to the back of the cab.




    It just clears the back of the seat.


    So, with that in place, I could start shoving wire into places.


    And routing it around roughly where the old wires used to run.


    All the bodge-wires behind the dash were then surplus to requirements, so out they came; which was a bit of a step, since they've been running the truck since about the time I first had it running.


    Not that it looks much less bodged, yet.

    With that all at a nice stopping point, the next step was clearly the brake system; after all, I'd had that rebuild kit for a week or two now, so I might as well unearth the master cylinder again.

    A little exploratory poking, podging, and delicate prying managed to extract the pistons and springs, one by one...


    Mmm, crusty!


    The other piston's seals didn't look too bad, though.


    The bore seemed to clean up very nicely, and wasn't looking totally terrible to start with.


    A little more cleaning out and a dunk in the parts washer got rid of the remaining iffy spots in there.


    I'll be headed out to HTS on Wednesday to see about getting replacement seals, or something like. Further news on that front as it progresses. And, with another jump-cut...

    We end up at the fuel level sender (again!). I managed to snap two of the three little retaining 'hooks' that held the cover on, so I had to fabricate a spring clip out of some steel strapping. This was after the cleaning & measuring to figure out whether or not it was still even usable.


    Then, to the tank, which cleaned up very nicely and shows no signs of leaks -- though I'm sure something'll turn up once it's all painted, reassembled, fitted, etc. -- so I started to paint it. Two coats of primer around it, so far; and I cleaned the uppermost end-part after this picture was taken.

    I'm sure it won't be quite as good as the old red lead that the chassis was originally primed in, but I'll make do with what I have. (Much to the chagrin of the DBG crowd, I'm sure, this will be going gloss black eventually. )


    Now, with the electrical work I've done resulting in all the bodge-wires disappearing, the fuel pump didn't have anything to connect to any more; so I took that as my cue to move it to it's proper place -- or at least nearer to it -- as it's been connected about where the fuel filter should have been. This meant I needed to fit the fuel filter, so I could connect the two bits of pipe.


    I wouldn't recommend this fuel filter, with hindsight. I got it because it had the two 8mm fittings on top, and it's quite a large filter; but I hadn't realised it also has a strange feature on top that is meant to take a special fitting that I believe is a return/bleed from the pressure regulator in its original application.

    But, it's what I have, so it's what I'll use. I tried to plug the hole for the odd fitting, since it turned out to be about the perfect size to tap for 1/4 BSP; but I didn't manage to seal it quite tight enough, because there's a very gentle bubbling from it when the fuel pump is running. It's not to the point of actually dripping, but there's very definitely a lack of sealing.

    Since I'd decided to use it -- after all, I'd paid for the damn thing -- I needed to make a bracket to mount it to the truck. Some bashing, prying, and welding ensued...


    "A grinder and paint [...]"

    (No, I shan't be awarding prizes for guessing where that nicely-profiled bit came from. )

    Some holes were drilled, spatter removed, edges cleaned up, and some paint thrown at it; and I bolted it to the truck. Though I haven't yet gotten a picture of it fitted, because I was too busy getting the truck to fire up on the new electrical system for the first time. It's nice to be able to start the truck with a key and a starter button; rather than twisting wires, etc.

  6. #115
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Sittingbourne Kent
    Posts
    1,320

    Default Re: It's here! (Bedford RL)

    DBG doesn't mean Dead Black Gloss, then?
    Rob
    Zero-Five-Two

    If at first you dont succeed, get a bigger hammer........... avoid the disappointment and use the big hammer in the first place

    One Militant is not enough

    1954 AEC Militant Mk1 Timber Tractor 01BP60........aka. 375 UXK

    1954 AEC Militant Mk1 Fuel Tanker 65BN57.......aka. 294 UYU

  7. #116
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
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    146

    Default Re: It's here! (Bedford RL)

    Quote Originally Posted by Zero-Five-Two View Post
    DBG doesn't mean Dead Black Gloss, then?
    Oh, so that's why all the grumbling about getting the right shade...

  8. #117
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
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    146

    Default Re: It's here! (Bedford RL)

    Filter in place!


    Yes, I need to do a lot of cleaning and tidying up behind there. So much stuff to do, so little time.
    I still have to run quite a few cables back down the chassis, but I've just left those bundled up for now, so I can deal with them later. (That's the wire for beacons at the rear, power for the rear view camera, and power for the fuel pump.)

    Onwards and upwards, however. Or, rather, backwards and downwards...


    The results of a thorough wire-brushing, and an application of Kurust.


    New threaded bit, and a couple of coats of primer...

    Then my tin of black paint turned up, so I decided to paint the tank. As you do.

    Mmmm, glossy.

    The camera does a wonderful job of picking up every little imperfection, naturally. It doesn't look this bad in person; and seems like it should smooth out no problem with a bit of elbow-grease and high-grit sandpaper.


    Painted one of the tank-brackets, then went on to the other. And y'know those days when you'd rather the bolt just snapped, because it'd be quicker than fighting the nut off it? Yeah, it was one of those days. Still, it's unbolted from the truck.

    Makes a pretty nice comparison between the freshly painted one, and the one fresh off the truck, though.


    So, once again for the second time; lots of wire-brushing, paint with rust-killer, come back when that's dried, 2 coats of primer, then when that's dried, slather black paint on. (Though this bracket will have another little bit of plate welded on to mount the fuel pump to; since it's got to go somewhere near the tank.)

  9. #118
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
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    146

    Default Re: It's here! (Bedford RL)

    Fuel tank is on, fuel pump is mounted, and all works as it should; except for that damn hole in the top of the fuel filter for whatever valve is meant to go in there in its original application. Trying a new method of sealing it, hopefully it'll stop the seep of fuel.

    Tank was a minor faff to get re-fitted. The forward bracket didn't want to line up with the holes I took it out of. (Bloody hole fairies again.), so I had to drill a new hole.
    Then the studding I put on the tank-straps turned out not to be long enough, so I had to make up some extensions on the poverty-lathe. And then I broke off the pipe from the pickup in the tank; leaving me with only a stub to attach a section of rubber hose to.

    However...


    What an exhausting, frustrating, but successful day. Some more detail pictures will follow later.

  10. #119
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    Dec 2015
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    146

    Default Re: It's here! (Bedford RL)

    Quote Originally Posted by Tamber View Post
    Some more detail pictures will follow later.
    And so!

    Quote Originally Posted by Tamber View Post
    Then the studding I put on the tank-straps turned out not to be long enough, so I had to make up some extensions on the poverty-lathe.


    Nut (non-nyloc) welded to the head of a bolt; the bolt chucked up in the drill, and the whole mess spun while carefully applying a flap-wheel on a grinder to make it round and neat.

    Then, stand back and admire your progress.


    The straps are a tiny bit loose, because of where the extensions stop them tightening any further; but I'm going to get some rubber strips to add as padding between the tank and the tank straps, which will take up the slack.

    Cut off a section of the old hard-line to use as a hose-barb, then proceed to tighten it onto the fitting out of the fuel pickup so tightly that the line twists off. Curse profusely.


    The miracle-wire with a spade terminal on it, is the level sender connection. The original terminal had near enough infinite resistance, and I didn't want to destroy everything trying to undo the corroded lump at the top in the vain hope of fixing it. So I drilled a hole in the brass strip, soldered a wire in, and stuck that through a tight-fitting hole that I drilled in the lid; I've also added a ground wire because there's no other way that it'll all ground through the freshly painted tank and brackets, it runs down to the pump, where it joins a 6mm˛ ground-wire that runs up to the bolt through the freshly-drilled hole holding the tank bracket on.

    Recovery from destroying the pipe: Cut the twisted bits off, leaving just enough that a hose will push on and a hose-clamp screwed down really tightly holds well.


    Then, the moment of truth:


    My funnel wasn't long enough to reach the filler neck without being nearly horizontal, and I left my little transfer pump (the bulb type) at home. Thankfully, I don't ever throw anything away, and this redex bottle turned out to be pretty much perfect for turning into an extension funnel.

    Then I needed a temporary filler cap, while I sort out the 'original' one.


    Turns out, if you cut the threads off a Scania locking fuel cap, and file it smooth, it wedges in there quite nicely.
    (No, I didn't sacrifice it for that purpose; it was already scrap. Someone left it screwed into the aluminium filler neck while they plasma'd it from the tank. Turns out, aluminium is really good at conducting heat; and those plastic threads don't like heat very much. )

    EDIT: Oh! I forgot to mention; I also sorted the leak in the fuel filter. Couldn't get the threaded fitting to seal with ptfe tape (it just dissolved); couldn't get an O-ring to stay put under it without a washer, but a washer meant the threads wouldn't engage any more because of the taper; so I stuck the O-ring on with the silicon gasket-maker, then gooped the hell out of the threads with the same silicon. Tried it this afternoon while on my dinner-break, and it seems to be holding very nicely.

    Considering the pressure behind it, I'm going to call it good. (When I pulled the little black & blue pipe cap from the stub pipe last time, to unscrew the fitting and make another attempt at sealing it, there was enough residual pressure in there that petrol spurted up higher than the level of the truck roof.)
    Last edited by Tamber; 09-09-2016 at 20:19.

  11. #120
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Sittingbourne Kent
    Posts
    1,320

    Default Re: It's here! (Bedford RL)

    Nice progress, old truck tyre inner tube cuts up into nice strips to go under the straps. Love the idea of the "poverty lathe"
    Last edited by Zero-Five-Two; 11-09-2016 at 19:34. Reason: add more
    Rob
    Zero-Five-Two

    If at first you dont succeed, get a bigger hammer........... avoid the disappointment and use the big hammer in the first place

    One Militant is not enough

    1954 AEC Militant Mk1 Timber Tractor 01BP60........aka. 375 UXK

    1954 AEC Militant Mk1 Fuel Tanker 65BN57.......aka. 294 UYU

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