Page 252 of 256 FirstFirst ... 152202242250251252253254 ... LastLast
Results 2,511 to 2,520 of 2551

Thread: WW1 Thornycroft restoration

  1. #2511
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Pennsylvania, USA (ex-pat Brit)
    Posts
    28

    Default Re: WW1 Thornycroft restoration

    Steve, have you considered making an oddside? I was inspired by your threads on here to make some patterns for the Garrett. I made one handle (a smaller one than this) as a split pattern, but then I was told about an oddside (the part in the middle row, on the right). The idea is that rather than making a split in the part itself, the oddside defines the split; the first half of the mould is rammed up against the pattern, with the pattern in the oddside, and then the oddside is removed for ramming up the second half.

    The way we made it was to trace the outline of the part onto a piece of plywood, and then cut out with a coping saw. The back was then filled in to make it sturdy enough for ramming up. It only took a couple of hours to make, and it should make the mouldmaking process easier (and perhaps cheaper?).

    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMG_2835.jpg  


  2. Advertisement

  3. #2512
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Leicestershire
    Posts
    991

    Default Re: WW1 Thornycroft restoration

    Hi Ed.

    Yes, an oddside is certainly the way they will make it (I hope!). If there were going to be a handful of castings then I would make a wooden one. However, for one off, I anticipate that the moulder will make one of sand. In other words, he will place the pattern in a heap of sand and then manually cut it away along the centre line. He will dust it with parting sand and then proceed to fill the box. On turning the box over, he will cut the original heap of sand away, dust it again and then fill the second half of the box before parting in the usual way. The fun bit will be getting the pattern out of the sand as it is quite heavy and I don't want him drilling any holes in John's casting!

    We shall see.

    Steve

    PS Nice casting by the way. There is great satisfaction in doing it yourself!

  4. #2513

    Default Re: WW1 Thornycroft restoration

    Quote Originally Posted by flandersflyer View Post
    They are also referred to as "Nico press swedges"

    Common amongst aircraft builders
    Not quite correct. Nicopress Swagers are used to compress copper ferrules onto wire rope. First used by the National Telephone Supply Company for making rigging cables.

    As an aircraft mechanic I use one regularly, couldn't do without it!

  5. #2514
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Age
    66
    Posts
    1,624

    Smile Re: WW1 Thornycroft restoration

    Quote Originally Posted by flandersflyer View Post
    They are also referred to as "Nico press swedges"

    Common amongst aircraft builders
    'Skin Pins' , speed up version
    FULLTILT

  6. #2515
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Leeds
    Posts
    174

    Default Re: WW1 Thornycroft restoration

    Quote Originally Posted by Bertie Lissie View Post
    Not quite correct. Nicopress Swagers are used to compress copper ferrules onto wire rope. First used by the National Telephone Supply Company for making rigging cables.

    As an aircraft mechanic I use one regularly, couldn't do without it!
    Ok...

  7. #2516
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Leicestershire
    Posts
    991

    Default Re: WW1 Thornycroft restoration

    I have had the good fortune to have a few days holiday so I have been working on the fuel tank. First job was to mark the rivet holes in the wrapper for the end plates. I placed the wrapper on a piece of MDF and used my height gauge to scribe around both ends.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSCN6784.JPG 
Views:	1 
Size:	115.2 KB 
ID:	128437

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSCN6785.JPG 
Views:	1 
Size:	100.2 KB 
ID:	128438

    Then using every toolmakers clamp that I have, I gradually worked my way around, aligning the end plate with the edge of the wrapper before marking out the first holes and drilling through.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSCN6786.JPG 
Views:	1 
Size:	123.8 KB 
ID:	128439

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSCN6787.JPG 
Views:	1 
Size:	98.8 KB 
ID:	128440

    The Cleco plate clamps proved invaluable once again and I am now wondering how I ever did without them!

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSCN6788.JPG 
Views:	1 
Size:	108.8 KB 
ID:	128441

    I worked my way around to the top corners which were much harder work as we hadn't got the bends exactly right. Some care and effort brought the skin around and I drilled a few more holes through.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSCN6789.JPG 
Views:	1 
Size:	115.7 KB 
ID:	128442

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSCN6790.JPG 
Views:	0 
Size:	131.7 KB 
ID:	128443

    Both ends brought to the same stage. At this point, I marked where the skin should end.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSCN6791.JPG 
Views:	0 
Size:	123.1 KB 
ID:	128444

    Then it was a case of trimming off the excess using a disc cutter. Horrible noisy job!

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSCN6794.JPG 
Views:	0 
Size:	139.6 KB 
ID:	128445

    Drill and clamp a bit further to work out where the other end should finish.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSCN6795.JPG 
Views:	0 
Size:	147.9 KB 
ID:	128446

    Drill the rivet holes for the baffles.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSCN6796.JPG 
Views:	0 
Size:	118.9 KB 
ID:	128447

    Trim the end off and then mark and drill the holes for the longitudinal seam.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSCN6797.JPG 
Views:	0 
Size:	143.0 KB 
ID:	128448

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSCN6798.JPG 
Views:	0 
Size:	134.1 KB 
ID:	128449

    De-burr the inside.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSCN6799.JPG 
Views:	0 
Size:	144.1 KB 
ID:	128450

    Install the end again to check the fit.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSCN6800.JPG 
Views:	0 
Size:	109.6 KB 
ID:	128451

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSCN6801.JPG 
Views:	2 
Size:	90.3 KB 
ID:	128452

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSCN6803.JPG 
Views:	0 
Size:	129.0 KB 
ID:	128453

    All was well and even the longitudinal holes lined up. Now the challenge of fitting the baffles. These proved exceptionally awkward as, whilst the wrapper was approximately the right shape, it wasn't perfect and getting the baffle inside was very hard prompting a lot of cursing. I took a judgement as to where the baffle was correctly positioned and marked a single rivet hole, removed the baffle and drilled through, then replaced it and put a fastener to secure the position. I marked the other holes on that side and could see that the rear face looked to be in line so I marked them as well. Removed it again, drilled through, replaced it and bolted up again. The other faces were coming into line now so I could mark them and go through the whole performance again. They all worked out OK in the end but it was a very hard and frustrating job which I was pleased to complete!

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSCN6804.JPG 
Views:	0 
Size:	111.6 KB 
ID:	128454

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSCN6805.JPG 
Views:	0 
Size:	115.5 KB 
ID:	128455

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSCN6806.JPG 
Views:	0 
Size:	98.8 KB 
ID:	128456

  8. #2517
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Leicestershire
    Posts
    991

    Default Re: WW1 Thornycroft restoration

    Eventually both ends were done to a sigh of relief.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSCN6808.JPG 
Views:	1 
Size:	124.7 KB 
ID:	128457

    Now, to fit the sump. Father had previously made this so it was a case of spotting through and then cutting out the centre.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSCN6809.JPG 
Views:	1 
Size:	106.8 KB 
ID:	128458

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSCN6812.JPG 
Views:	2 
Size:	81.2 KB 
ID:	128460

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSCN6810.JPG 
Views:	1 
Size:	92.8 KB 
ID:	128459

    Then the filler neck. This is an original casting, rescued from our rotten tank. Again spot through the holes and cut out the centre.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSCN6814.JPG 
Views:	1 
Size:	106.1 KB 
ID:	128461

    This was done with the nibbler which is a great tool, if hard to guide!

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSCN6815.JPG 
Views:	1 
Size:	121.2 KB 
ID:	128462

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSCN6816.JPG 
Views:	1 
Size:	114.2 KB 
ID:	128463

    All ready for soldering and rivetting up, my next task!

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSCN6817.JPG 
Views:	170 
Size:	123.7 KB 
ID:	128464

    Steve

  9. #2518
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Leeds
    Posts
    174

    Default Re: WW1 Thornycroft restoration

    Invest in some holesaws Steve

    I use DART...

  10. #2519
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    95

    Default Re: WW1 Thornycroft restoration

    QL Driver

    I must be missing something, so please explain:

    how did you replicate the casting numbers so crisply?

    Regards
    Doug

  11. #2520
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Anywhere between Falkirk and Aberdeen, depending on the day ...
    Posts
    1,424

    Default Re: WW1 Thornycroft restoration

    Quote Originally Posted by dgrev View Post
    QL Driver
    I must be missing something, so please explain: how did you replicate the casting numbers so crisply? Regards Doug
    Little glue-on plastic numbers for use on patterns Doug, available in a range of sizes as you may expect. regards Gordon

Page 252 of 256 FirstFirst ... 152202242250251252253254 ... LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Thornycroft Amazon
    By Rlangham in forum British Vehicles
    Replies: 38
    Last Post: 22-02-2015, 17:09
  2. Thornycroft Panel
    By Blackpowder44 in forum British Vehicles
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 23-10-2009, 12:29
  3. Thornycroft Hathi
    By antarmike in forum Pre WW2 vehicles
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 05-02-2009, 19:20
  4. Thornycroft J type Lorry AA gun
    By Rlangham in forum Pre WW2 vehicles
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 25-09-2008, 09:01
  5. Thornycroft for sale
    By Simon in forum Old Classifieds & Wanted ads (Closed for new Threads)
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 19-01-2006, 07:37

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Allied Forces